Academic department under which the project should be listed

RCHSS - English

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Faculty Sponsor Name

Anna Weinstein

Disciplines

Technical and Professional Writing

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Screenplay Analysis: An Evaluation of Strategy of Mean Girls

Author: Zora Evans

This presentation explores the hardships and drama-filled journey of adjusting to high school. Protagonist Cady Heron has just moved all the way from Africa to the United States in the 2004 comedy film Mean Girls. Heron’s main objective in the film is to adjust to public school, find a group of friends, and fit in. Tina Fey writes this script in a very precise and unique way. This study addresses how Tina Fey’s script creates side characters that are more memorable and active than the protagonist while keeping the interest of the audience. Fey’s writing styles and strategies actively help to push the film forward through everyone except Cady Heron. The popular girls, also known as “The Plastics,” and Cady’s friends Janis and Damian push the storyline along for the main character, which makes the storyline unique and grasps the audience’s attention. Fey uses many of the supporting characters to build the protagonist’s conflict, journey, and resolution, which is an incredibly unique strategy. Most successful movies have a very active protagonist making choices that push the story forward, but Tina Fey’s Mean Girls breaks the mold and introduces a new way of screenwriting.

Project Type

Oral Presentation (15-min time slots)

How will this be presented?

Yes, asynchronously via recorded video upload

Screen Recording 2021-11-12 at 7.15.18 PM.mov (638438 kB)
Presentation Video Mean Girls. Evans, Zora

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Screenplay Analysis Mean Girls

Screenplay Analysis: An Evaluation of Strategy of Mean Girls

Author: Zora Evans

This presentation explores the hardships and drama-filled journey of adjusting to high school. Protagonist Cady Heron has just moved all the way from Africa to the United States in the 2004 comedy film Mean Girls. Heron’s main objective in the film is to adjust to public school, find a group of friends, and fit in. Tina Fey writes this script in a very precise and unique way. This study addresses how Tina Fey’s script creates side characters that are more memorable and active than the protagonist while keeping the interest of the audience. Fey’s writing styles and strategies actively help to push the film forward through everyone except Cady Heron. The popular girls, also known as “The Plastics,” and Cady’s friends Janis and Damian push the storyline along for the main character, which makes the storyline unique and grasps the audience’s attention. Fey uses many of the supporting characters to build the protagonist’s conflict, journey, and resolution, which is an incredibly unique strategy. Most successful movies have a very active protagonist making choices that push the story forward, but Tina Fey’s Mean Girls breaks the mold and introduces a new way of screenwriting.

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