Project Title

Average Commute Times

Presenters

Rebecca BoydFollow

Academic department under which the project should be listed

RCHSS - Geography & Anthropology

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Faculty Sponsor Name

Ulrike Ingram

Disciplines

Geographic Information Sciences | Human Geography

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Commutes to and from work are often known to be long and draining. Those in the United States are subjected to averages of 30 minutes or more. This poster discusses the states’ average commutes and the relationship between Georgia’s population density and average commutes times based on county. The main objective of the poster is to note these relationships for future projects.

The relationships were found using data collected from an array of sources: The U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey, ESRI, and the EPA. Data such as population density and commute times were gathered and put into a table, then added into ArcGIS Pro, and analyzed based on different qualities. State layers were found as shapefiles from the Census Bureau and added to the maps as well. The results were different based on each map's information; however, there is a correlation between drive times and population density.

The results from the poster show how higher population counties are more likely to have a higher commuting average, and states with larger population densities also have a larger commuting average.

Project Type

Poster

How will this be presented?

Yes, asynchronously via recorded video upload

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Average Commute Times

Commutes to and from work are often known to be long and draining. Those in the United States are subjected to averages of 30 minutes or more. This poster discusses the states’ average commutes and the relationship between Georgia’s population density and average commutes times based on county. The main objective of the poster is to note these relationships for future projects.

The relationships were found using data collected from an array of sources: The U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey, ESRI, and the EPA. Data such as population density and commute times were gathered and put into a table, then added into ArcGIS Pro, and analyzed based on different qualities. State layers were found as shapefiles from the Census Bureau and added to the maps as well. The results were different based on each map's information; however, there is a correlation between drive times and population density.

The results from the poster show how higher population counties are more likely to have a higher commuting average, and states with larger population densities also have a larger commuting average.

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