Project Title

Barriers to Medication Adherence in Adult HIV-Positive Minorities

Academic department under which the project should be listed

WCHHS - Nursing

Faculty Sponsor Name

Mary Dioise Ramos, PhD, RN

Disciplines

Nursing

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Abstract

Background: Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is used for individuals living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which is used to prevent the progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). However, despite ART being highly effective for the treatment of HIV, poor medication adherence occurs in today’s society, particularly in the minority population in the United States.

Purpose: This study synthesized the available evidence about factors and barriers that disproportionately affect medication adherence among the minority population living with HIV.

Methods: The Johns Hopkins Evidence-Based Practice Model and Guidelines were used in the literature review, critical analysis, leveling of evidence, and quality rating. The PRISMA flow diagram was used to map out the number of records for inclusion and exclusion. Databases such as CINAHL, PubMed, and ProQuest were used to provide evidence for the research. “Multilevel Barriers for HIV Medication,” “HIV positive minority or HIV positive or minority,” “barriers or factors or attributes,” “medications or Antiretroviral therapy or drugs,” and “adherence or consistency” were search strategies used. These studies focused on minority participants aging 18 years and up that are diagnosed with HIV. Measures used to identify barriers included socio-ecological model (SEM), constant comparative method, multilevel model building, bivariate correlation table, HIV care continuum (public health model), audio-computer administered self-interviews (ACASI), and clinical medical records.

Results: The initial search yielded 47 articles. Following the removal of duplicates and screening, seven articles were included for evidence appraisal. The identified barriers in poor medication adherence include financial instability, social stigma, educational deficits, legal status, transitional care, and factors related to the LGBTQ+ community.

Conclusion: The barriers in HIV medication adherence in minorities constitute a preventable problem. Awareness of the impact of barriers in HIV medication adherence may help healthcare providers and policymakers to plan and implement proper care management among this minority population group.

Project Type

Poster

How will this be presented?

Yes, in person

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Barriers to Medication Adherence in Adult HIV-Positive Minorities

Abstract

Background: Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is used for individuals living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which is used to prevent the progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). However, despite ART being highly effective for the treatment of HIV, poor medication adherence occurs in today’s society, particularly in the minority population in the United States.

Purpose: This study synthesized the available evidence about factors and barriers that disproportionately affect medication adherence among the minority population living with HIV.

Methods: The Johns Hopkins Evidence-Based Practice Model and Guidelines were used in the literature review, critical analysis, leveling of evidence, and quality rating. The PRISMA flow diagram was used to map out the number of records for inclusion and exclusion. Databases such as CINAHL, PubMed, and ProQuest were used to provide evidence for the research. “Multilevel Barriers for HIV Medication,” “HIV positive minority or HIV positive or minority,” “barriers or factors or attributes,” “medications or Antiretroviral therapy or drugs,” and “adherence or consistency” were search strategies used. These studies focused on minority participants aging 18 years and up that are diagnosed with HIV. Measures used to identify barriers included socio-ecological model (SEM), constant comparative method, multilevel model building, bivariate correlation table, HIV care continuum (public health model), audio-computer administered self-interviews (ACASI), and clinical medical records.

Results: The initial search yielded 47 articles. Following the removal of duplicates and screening, seven articles were included for evidence appraisal. The identified barriers in poor medication adherence include financial instability, social stigma, educational deficits, legal status, transitional care, and factors related to the LGBTQ+ community.

Conclusion: The barriers in HIV medication adherence in minorities constitute a preventable problem. Awareness of the impact of barriers in HIV medication adherence may help healthcare providers and policymakers to plan and implement proper care management among this minority population group.

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