Project Title

Distraction as a Tactic for Pain Management During Venipuncture Procedures Among Pediatric Patients

Academic department under which the project should be listed

WCHHS - Nursing

Faculty Sponsor Name

Mary Dioise Ramos

Disciplines

Pediatric Nursing

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Background: Various research has found that venipuncture can cause significant pain and discomfort for pediatric patients. This can also cause an influx in anxiety for both the patients and their families during hospitalization. While significant research has been done on interventions to lessen this pain and anxiety, there is little known about the use of routine and effective distraction techniques to decrease venipuncture pain for hospitalized pediatric patients. Aim: The purpose of this study is to examine if distraction techniques used during pediatric venipuncture results in lower pain ratings compared to when distraction is not utilized. Methods: The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guided the selection of literature. A comprehensive review was conducted analyzing and appraising articles from Medline, CINAHL, and PubMed. Pain levels were analyzed using parental and patient reports and the Wong-Baker FACES scale. Anxiety, fear, and stress levels were also assessed. Results: Fifteen articles met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed for this study. The results of the study indicated that distraction helps lessen venipuncture pain in hospitalized children. While pain is still experienced, those undergoing distraction techniques reported less pain than their counterparts. Conclusion: The information in this study can be used to guide protocols for pain management among children in the acute care setting.

Project Type

Poster

How will this be presented?

Yes, in person

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Distraction as a Tactic for Pain Management During Venipuncture Procedures Among Pediatric Patients

Background: Various research has found that venipuncture can cause significant pain and discomfort for pediatric patients. This can also cause an influx in anxiety for both the patients and their families during hospitalization. While significant research has been done on interventions to lessen this pain and anxiety, there is little known about the use of routine and effective distraction techniques to decrease venipuncture pain for hospitalized pediatric patients. Aim: The purpose of this study is to examine if distraction techniques used during pediatric venipuncture results in lower pain ratings compared to when distraction is not utilized. Methods: The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guided the selection of literature. A comprehensive review was conducted analyzing and appraising articles from Medline, CINAHL, and PubMed. Pain levels were analyzed using parental and patient reports and the Wong-Baker FACES scale. Anxiety, fear, and stress levels were also assessed. Results: Fifteen articles met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed for this study. The results of the study indicated that distraction helps lessen venipuncture pain in hospitalized children. While pain is still experienced, those undergoing distraction techniques reported less pain than their counterparts. Conclusion: The information in this study can be used to guide protocols for pain management among children in the acute care setting.

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