Project Title

Women Experiencing Postpartum Depression

Academic department under which the project should be listed

WCHHS - Nursing

Faculty Sponsor Name

Mary Dioise Ramos

Disciplines

Maternal, Child Health and Neonatal Nursing | Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Women Experiencing Postpartum Depression

Postpartum depression (PPD) is an ongoing issue when it comes to mothers after birth. PPD has been shown to affect up to 15% of mothers and is often skipped over when it comes to medical diagnosis and treatment. When postpartum depression becomes severe, it turns into psychosis, and this is considered a psychiatric emergency. The overall purpose of this project was to address the question: How postpartum women with depression receiving psychotherapy are compared to those postpartum women with depression without psychotherapy affect outcomes within 10 months of postpartum The John Hopkins Evidence-Based Practice Model was used to review and analyze research studies. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guided the selection of literature. There are 21 articles that met the inclusion criteria. Postpartum women who received psychotherapy for postpartum depression showed positive outcomes such as healthy relationships with their children, while women who did not receive psychotherapy for postpartum depression showed a neutral or negative outcome in comparison to the women who received psychotherapy. Psychotherapy is an effective intervention for postpartum women with depression. Nurses have key responsibilities in educating women and their families about how psychotherapy can help reduce postpartum depression and how it can impact positive outcomes in their lives.

Project Type

Poster

How will this be presented?

Yes, in person

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Women Experiencing Postpartum Depression

Women Experiencing Postpartum Depression

Postpartum depression (PPD) is an ongoing issue when it comes to mothers after birth. PPD has been shown to affect up to 15% of mothers and is often skipped over when it comes to medical diagnosis and treatment. When postpartum depression becomes severe, it turns into psychosis, and this is considered a psychiatric emergency. The overall purpose of this project was to address the question: How postpartum women with depression receiving psychotherapy are compared to those postpartum women with depression without psychotherapy affect outcomes within 10 months of postpartum The John Hopkins Evidence-Based Practice Model was used to review and analyze research studies. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guided the selection of literature. There are 21 articles that met the inclusion criteria. Postpartum women who received psychotherapy for postpartum depression showed positive outcomes such as healthy relationships with their children, while women who did not receive psychotherapy for postpartum depression showed a neutral or negative outcome in comparison to the women who received psychotherapy. Psychotherapy is an effective intervention for postpartum women with depression. Nurses have key responsibilities in educating women and their families about how psychotherapy can help reduce postpartum depression and how it can impact positive outcomes in their lives.

blog comments powered by Disqus