Project Title

Reducing Rates of Burnout in Newly Licensed Nurses Through Resiliency Programs

Academic department under which the project should be listed

WCHHS - Nursing

Faculty Sponsor Name

Dr. Mary Dioise Ramos

Disciplines

Other Nursing

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Background: New graduate nurses face many struggles transitioning from student nurse to registered nurse, including nurse bullying, lack of confidence, and fear of making mistakes. With the added stress of the COVID-19 pandemic, newly licensed nurses (NLNs) are facing greater anxiety than usual. Without proper coping mechanisms, burnout can occur quickly, leading to decreased job satisfaction, increased clinical errors, and increased resignations. The purpose of this project is to understand how resiliency programs for NLNs impact the transition from school to practice, specifically if burnout rates among this group are reduced.

Method: A comprehensive review was conducted to analyze and appraise articles from multiple databases using the John Hopkins Evidence-Based Practice Model. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guided the selection of literature.

Results: High levels of resiliency among NLNs are correlated with increased job satisfaction and intention to stay in the nursing profession. Multiple factors have been found to contribute to high levels of resiliency among NLNs, notably mentorship opportunities, adequate staffing, and promotion of work-life balance. Many of the studies showed that the NLNs who were exposed to resiliency programs experienced a longer window before reaching a burnout state or did not experience burnout at all, as compared to the NLNs who did not engage in resiliency programs.

Conclusion: To reduce the onset of burnout in the NLNs and increase job satisfaction, employers would greatly benefit from implementing resiliency programs for this population of nurses.

Project Type

Poster

How will this be presented?

Yes, in person

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Reducing Rates of Burnout in Newly Licensed Nurses Through Resiliency Programs

Background: New graduate nurses face many struggles transitioning from student nurse to registered nurse, including nurse bullying, lack of confidence, and fear of making mistakes. With the added stress of the COVID-19 pandemic, newly licensed nurses (NLNs) are facing greater anxiety than usual. Without proper coping mechanisms, burnout can occur quickly, leading to decreased job satisfaction, increased clinical errors, and increased resignations. The purpose of this project is to understand how resiliency programs for NLNs impact the transition from school to practice, specifically if burnout rates among this group are reduced.

Method: A comprehensive review was conducted to analyze and appraise articles from multiple databases using the John Hopkins Evidence-Based Practice Model. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guided the selection of literature.

Results: High levels of resiliency among NLNs are correlated with increased job satisfaction and intention to stay in the nursing profession. Multiple factors have been found to contribute to high levels of resiliency among NLNs, notably mentorship opportunities, adequate staffing, and promotion of work-life balance. Many of the studies showed that the NLNs who were exposed to resiliency programs experienced a longer window before reaching a burnout state or did not experience burnout at all, as compared to the NLNs who did not engage in resiliency programs.

Conclusion: To reduce the onset of burnout in the NLNs and increase job satisfaction, employers would greatly benefit from implementing resiliency programs for this population of nurses.

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