Project Title

"The Oriental Princess": Intersectionality in Euripides's Medea

Presenters

Riley BorstFollow

Academic department under which the project should be listed

COTA - Theatre and Performance Studies

Faculty Sponsor Name

Thomas Fish

Disciplines

Arts and Humanities | Classics | Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies | Theatre and Performance Studies

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Riley Borst

Kennesaw State University

1 November 2021

rborst@students.kennesaw.edu

“The Oriental Princess”: Intersectionality in Euripides’s Medea

The paper examines the play Medea and how the topic of intersectionality is woven throughout the language and plot. Women and immigrants in Greece were treated as second-class citizens, and this paper examines how Euripides’s Medea is an example of being a voice for oppressed people. Through this, it becomes clear that, when examined in the scope of a modern lens, Medea’s character showcases the topics of feminism and xenophobia.

My research inspects the language and plot of Medea to see how women were given a powerful voice in this play through a character who has been constantly labeled as a villain. Medea, I will explain, is a strong, self-reliant woman who fights for the justice she deserves in her life, in contrast to the unhinged stereotype that has always followed her character. She also fights for her spot in ancient Greece even though she is a foreigner in the land. I will be investigating the language and character in Medea along with historical presidents of the time to strengthen my argument through the lens of intersectionality. I will also be expanding upon the work of “Medea the Feminist” (Betine Van Zyl Smit) and “Rhetorical Feminism in Euripedes’ ‘Medea.’” (Jeffrey Zorn) while also incorporating how Medea’s race also plays a critical role in the way her character is treated. This project highlights the relevance of classical theatre in today’s society and provides possible insight for directors who want to rework classical texts for modern audiences. It allows us to examine how relevant topics like feminism and xenophobia are depicted in classical literature.

Project Type

Oral Presentation (15-min time slots)

How will this be presented?

Yes, in person

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"The Oriental Princess": Intersectionality in Euripides's Medea

Riley Borst

Kennesaw State University

1 November 2021

rborst@students.kennesaw.edu

“The Oriental Princess”: Intersectionality in Euripides’s Medea

The paper examines the play Medea and how the topic of intersectionality is woven throughout the language and plot. Women and immigrants in Greece were treated as second-class citizens, and this paper examines how Euripides’s Medea is an example of being a voice for oppressed people. Through this, it becomes clear that, when examined in the scope of a modern lens, Medea’s character showcases the topics of feminism and xenophobia.

My research inspects the language and plot of Medea to see how women were given a powerful voice in this play through a character who has been constantly labeled as a villain. Medea, I will explain, is a strong, self-reliant woman who fights for the justice she deserves in her life, in contrast to the unhinged stereotype that has always followed her character. She also fights for her spot in ancient Greece even though she is a foreigner in the land. I will be investigating the language and character in Medea along with historical presidents of the time to strengthen my argument through the lens of intersectionality. I will also be expanding upon the work of “Medea the Feminist” (Betine Van Zyl Smit) and “Rhetorical Feminism in Euripedes’ ‘Medea.’” (Jeffrey Zorn) while also incorporating how Medea’s race also plays a critical role in the way her character is treated. This project highlights the relevance of classical theatre in today’s society and provides possible insight for directors who want to rework classical texts for modern audiences. It allows us to examine how relevant topics like feminism and xenophobia are depicted in classical literature.

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