Project Title

Women, Connection, and Recovery: A Case Study

Academic department under which the project should be listed

WCHHS - Social Work and Human Services

Faculty Sponsor Name

Dr. Jennifer A. Wade-Berg

Disciplines

Gender and Sexuality | Social Work

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Women who suffer from substance use disorders have consistently been an underserved population. Addiction through history has been seen as a men's issue because women with addiction seek treatment at lower rates. Some of the reasons for this are stigma, lower-income, and being a primary caretaker for children. Women are also more likely to suffer from other disorders connected to addiction, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Because of this, women also have special needs in treatment. One need often left out of the research was the connection factor, i.e., women need other women to succeed, and recovery is no different. The research question under inquiry is How do women's connections with other women in sobriety affect the quality of their recovery? Secondary data from Rivermend Health were collected for this case study. The study focused on women's connection with one another during the recovery process. The data consisted of mental health scores from the beginning of treatment and the end of treatment from a woman living in her own home and a woman staying in recovery residences through treatment. The results were compared. The comparison examined the differences between scores and the factors of connection that play a role in recovery. It is expected that women who built strong relationships with other women in recovery have lower rates of anxiety and depression and a better chance of long-term recovery. One of the study's limitations is that the final test scores are collected on the day of discharge, resulting in clients answering questions dishonestly so they can leave. Recommendations include ways to connect women in recovery, such as women's groups in treatment and creating guides for local women's 12-step meetings.

Project Type

Poster

How will this be presented?

Yes, in person

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Women, Connection, and Recovery: A Case Study

Women who suffer from substance use disorders have consistently been an underserved population. Addiction through history has been seen as a men's issue because women with addiction seek treatment at lower rates. Some of the reasons for this are stigma, lower-income, and being a primary caretaker for children. Women are also more likely to suffer from other disorders connected to addiction, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Because of this, women also have special needs in treatment. One need often left out of the research was the connection factor, i.e., women need other women to succeed, and recovery is no different. The research question under inquiry is How do women's connections with other women in sobriety affect the quality of their recovery? Secondary data from Rivermend Health were collected for this case study. The study focused on women's connection with one another during the recovery process. The data consisted of mental health scores from the beginning of treatment and the end of treatment from a woman living in her own home and a woman staying in recovery residences through treatment. The results were compared. The comparison examined the differences between scores and the factors of connection that play a role in recovery. It is expected that women who built strong relationships with other women in recovery have lower rates of anxiety and depression and a better chance of long-term recovery. One of the study's limitations is that the final test scores are collected on the day of discharge, resulting in clients answering questions dishonestly so they can leave. Recommendations include ways to connect women in recovery, such as women's groups in treatment and creating guides for local women's 12-step meetings.

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