Project Title

PERCEPTIONS OF PHUBBING: A COMPARISON OF SELF, FRIENDS, AND ROMANTIC PARTNERS

Presenters

Academic department under which the project should be listed

RCHSS - Psychological Science

Faculty Sponsor Name

Amy Buddie

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Research has shown that with growing social media presence, the consequences can be both negative and positive. One of the negative consequences of social media is phubbing. Phubbing is a relatively new term that was introduced in 2012 during a political campaign (Ugur & Koc, 2015). The word comes from the blending of the words phone and snubbing. Phubbing means snubbing others during social interactions by instead focusing on a smartphone. Very little research exists on this topic given the newness of the word, and research is starting to explore the negative effects of social media. The existing literature focuses on addiction issues (e.g., Internet addiction), and phubbing’s relationship to depressive symptoms. We wanted to expand on the existing literature by examining the extent to which participants perceive phubbing differently when responding to their own versus others’ behavior. In addition, we were interested in examining differences in phubbing by friends versus relationship partners. We also plan to expand the literature by looking at different populations. In the current study, we are asking questions about different types of social media usage as well as what types of technology are most commonly used. We are also asking questions about phubbing in relation to themselves (e.g., “I send texts or emails during face-to-face conversations”), their friends (e.g., “My friends send texts or emails during face-to-face conversations”), and their romantic partners (e.g., “My partner sends texts or emails during face to-face conversations”). We will be recruiting through social media, introductory psychology courses, and a faculty announcement system. We expect to find negative correlations between social media usage and taking offense to phubbing. Analyses will include repeated measures ANOVA by using the same target questions asked in four different ways. Our research will contribute to the broader conversation of how social media is changing relationships.

Project Type

Poster

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PERCEPTIONS OF PHUBBING: A COMPARISON OF SELF, FRIENDS, AND ROMANTIC PARTNERS

Research has shown that with growing social media presence, the consequences can be both negative and positive. One of the negative consequences of social media is phubbing. Phubbing is a relatively new term that was introduced in 2012 during a political campaign (Ugur & Koc, 2015). The word comes from the blending of the words phone and snubbing. Phubbing means snubbing others during social interactions by instead focusing on a smartphone. Very little research exists on this topic given the newness of the word, and research is starting to explore the negative effects of social media. The existing literature focuses on addiction issues (e.g., Internet addiction), and phubbing’s relationship to depressive symptoms. We wanted to expand on the existing literature by examining the extent to which participants perceive phubbing differently when responding to their own versus others’ behavior. In addition, we were interested in examining differences in phubbing by friends versus relationship partners. We also plan to expand the literature by looking at different populations. In the current study, we are asking questions about different types of social media usage as well as what types of technology are most commonly used. We are also asking questions about phubbing in relation to themselves (e.g., “I send texts or emails during face-to-face conversations”), their friends (e.g., “My friends send texts or emails during face-to-face conversations”), and their romantic partners (e.g., “My partner sends texts or emails during face to-face conversations”). We will be recruiting through social media, introductory psychology courses, and a faculty announcement system. We expect to find negative correlations between social media usage and taking offense to phubbing. Analyses will include repeated measures ANOVA by using the same target questions asked in four different ways. Our research will contribute to the broader conversation of how social media is changing relationships.