Project Title

Discovering Ierapetra: Arthritis in Roman Crete

Presenters

Academic department under which the project should be listed

RCHSS - Geography & Anthropology

Faculty Sponsor Name

Dr. Susan Kirkpatrick Smith

This is a Directed Applied Research study. I am using deductive research from Dr. Smith's field notes and analyzing the data once placed in an excel spreadsheet. She did not require me to go through the IRB.

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Alexandra Beckett abecket1@students.kennesaw.edu

Dr. Smith

3/17/2018

Discovering Ierapetra: Arthritis in Roman Crete

Ierapetra is a town on the southeastern side of the Greek island of Crete. Starting in 2013 and to present day, archaeologists and physical anthropologists have been working through burial research in Ierapetra to find answers to the unknowns regarding the ancient people that resided there between approximately the 1st - 3rd centuries AD. Among these discoveries are the pathologies that plagued these ancient people, and what these pathologies could have meant for the daily lives of the people in Crete. This research, which focuses on three main excavation sites, Dialektaki, Petrantonaki, and Maliotaki, has uncovered that many of those living between the 1st - 3rd centuries AD lived with arthritis. Throughout the semester, I examined Dr. Susan Kirkpatrick Smith's fieldnotes on the Ierapetra excavation sites and placed them in an excel spreadsheet. Through this deductive method of research, I was able to decipher which pathologies were the most common. The results have shown a complex mix of many pathologies throughout the bones of the ancient people of Ierapetra, with the most common pathology found being arthritis. The study of arthritis on the bones of the ancient people of Ierapetra living between the 1st - 3rd centuries AD opens doors for further research into their daily lives. I suspect through my analysis that I will be able to compare their lives to others found at other sites from Crete or Greece.

Keywords: Crete; Pathologies; Osteophytes; Arthritis; Physical Anthropology; Ierapetra

Project Type

Poster

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Discovering Ierapetra: Arthritis in Roman Crete

Alexandra Beckett abecket1@students.kennesaw.edu

Dr. Smith

3/17/2018

Discovering Ierapetra: Arthritis in Roman Crete

Ierapetra is a town on the southeastern side of the Greek island of Crete. Starting in 2013 and to present day, archaeologists and physical anthropologists have been working through burial research in Ierapetra to find answers to the unknowns regarding the ancient people that resided there between approximately the 1st - 3rd centuries AD. Among these discoveries are the pathologies that plagued these ancient people, and what these pathologies could have meant for the daily lives of the people in Crete. This research, which focuses on three main excavation sites, Dialektaki, Petrantonaki, and Maliotaki, has uncovered that many of those living between the 1st - 3rd centuries AD lived with arthritis. Throughout the semester, I examined Dr. Susan Kirkpatrick Smith's fieldnotes on the Ierapetra excavation sites and placed them in an excel spreadsheet. Through this deductive method of research, I was able to decipher which pathologies were the most common. The results have shown a complex mix of many pathologies throughout the bones of the ancient people of Ierapetra, with the most common pathology found being arthritis. The study of arthritis on the bones of the ancient people of Ierapetra living between the 1st - 3rd centuries AD opens doors for further research into their daily lives. I suspect through my analysis that I will be able to compare their lives to others found at other sites from Crete or Greece.

Keywords: Crete; Pathologies; Osteophytes; Arthritis; Physical Anthropology; Ierapetra