Project Title

Eliminating drug use: A Comparative analysis of the efficacy of substance abuse intervention programs

Presenters

Faculty Sponsor Name

Dr Evelina Sterling

This was a comparative analysis project only

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Eliminating drug use: A Comparative analysis of the efficacy of substance abuse intervention programs

While collectively, substance abuse intervention programs have been shown to have variable rates of success, a number of programs have proven to be quite effective using replicable measures of success over the long term. The purpose of this study was to determine which specific factors of were most likely to lead to success among substance abuse intervention programs by evaluating and comparing five major national substance abuse programs implemented over the past 30 years. Given the nature of this study and its reliance on the perception of others, a qualitative research method was applied in conjunction with a comparative analysis assessing both programs deemed failures or ineffective in preventing substance abuse and those considered to be successful or effective with regard to long-term outcomes. Specific statistics showing marked improvements are included, though a substantial amount of evidence has been obtained through case studies, community engagement measures, and interviews with experts in the field. Results indicated that substance use intervention programs were most likely to be successful when the following factors were present: non-traditional curriculums, such as encouraging physical activity; peer support groups; situational re-enactments; and lastly, the acquisition of resistance and coping skills. In addition to this, some program participants were less likely to engage in substance abuse if the specific physical effects of substance use were known initially. With this research, our hope is to provide a framework for future health educators and public health professionals to utilize which can incorporate proven and specific evidence based results while still allowing the flexibility to cater to community and demographic differences.

Project Type

Poster

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Eliminating drug use: A Comparative analysis of the efficacy of substance abuse intervention programs

Eliminating drug use: A Comparative analysis of the efficacy of substance abuse intervention programs

While collectively, substance abuse intervention programs have been shown to have variable rates of success, a number of programs have proven to be quite effective using replicable measures of success over the long term. The purpose of this study was to determine which specific factors of were most likely to lead to success among substance abuse intervention programs by evaluating and comparing five major national substance abuse programs implemented over the past 30 years. Given the nature of this study and its reliance on the perception of others, a qualitative research method was applied in conjunction with a comparative analysis assessing both programs deemed failures or ineffective in preventing substance abuse and those considered to be successful or effective with regard to long-term outcomes. Specific statistics showing marked improvements are included, though a substantial amount of evidence has been obtained through case studies, community engagement measures, and interviews with experts in the field. Results indicated that substance use intervention programs were most likely to be successful when the following factors were present: non-traditional curriculums, such as encouraging physical activity; peer support groups; situational re-enactments; and lastly, the acquisition of resistance and coping skills. In addition to this, some program participants were less likely to engage in substance abuse if the specific physical effects of substance use were known initially. With this research, our hope is to provide a framework for future health educators and public health professionals to utilize which can incorporate proven and specific evidence based results while still allowing the flexibility to cater to community and demographic differences.