Project Title

Take Home Control Laboratory Equipment Design

Presenters

Academic department under which the project should be listed

SPCEET - Mechanical Engineering

Faculty Sponsor Name

Ayse Tekes

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Take home lab equipment and hands-on learning tools are still in demand for control theory and vibrations courses. The existing equipment are extremely expensive and require wide lab space. The aim of this research is to build mechanical and electrical systems that are compact, modular and small scale so that each student can work on their setup and take it home if necessary. For this purpose, in this study, we designed several mechanisms to be utilized in systems control and vibrations courses which would enhance the understanding of students by using experimental demonstration of the theoretical systems taught in class. The superiority of the designs over commercially available equipment are their low cost and simplicity. The designs include modeling a crank attached to a stepper motor, and a dual parallel arm mechanism consist of flexible links that are driven by a dwell typed cam. The mechanisms are designed in Solidworks and the prototypes are built using 3D printer and machining. The mathematical models of each systems are obtained using Euler's equations. The simulations are performed using Matlab Simulink and Simmechanics. The prototypes are made available to vibrations and control lab students and their feedback will be collected through a survey and the mechanisms will be modified based on their suggestions.

Project Type

Poster

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Take Home Control Laboratory Equipment Design

Take home lab equipment and hands-on learning tools are still in demand for control theory and vibrations courses. The existing equipment are extremely expensive and require wide lab space. The aim of this research is to build mechanical and electrical systems that are compact, modular and small scale so that each student can work on their setup and take it home if necessary. For this purpose, in this study, we designed several mechanisms to be utilized in systems control and vibrations courses which would enhance the understanding of students by using experimental demonstration of the theoretical systems taught in class. The superiority of the designs over commercially available equipment are their low cost and simplicity. The designs include modeling a crank attached to a stepper motor, and a dual parallel arm mechanism consist of flexible links that are driven by a dwell typed cam. The mechanisms are designed in Solidworks and the prototypes are built using 3D printer and machining. The mathematical models of each systems are obtained using Euler's equations. The simulations are performed using Matlab Simulink and Simmechanics. The prototypes are made available to vibrations and control lab students and their feedback will be collected through a survey and the mechanisms will be modified based on their suggestions.