Project Title

Characterization of Candida auris a novel drug resistant fungal pathogen

Presenters

Academic department under which the project should be listed

CSM - Molecular and Cellular Biology

Faculty Sponsor Name

Dr. Christopher Cornelison

Additional Faculty

Dr. Kyle Gabriel, Molecular and Cellular Biology, kgabrie5@kennesaw.edu

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Candida auris is an emerging fungal pathogen first documented in Asia that has since spread rapidly in healthcare facilities across the world, resulting in serious infections, some of which have been fatal. C. auris, is an invasive yeast species that has been found to be resistant to all three of the major classes of antifungal drugs. The doses required to kill the pathogen with these antifungals are toxic to humans. There is little information about C. auris in the databases of commercial identification systems, leading to C. auris to be often misidentified for C. haemulonii and Rhodotorula glutinis, yeasts that C. auris shares biochemical identification markers with. Misidentification of the pathogen can lead to an improper course of treatment as well as difficulties controlling outbreaks within hospitals. The Bioinnovation Lab of Kennesaw State University has been working to find ways to properly identify and treat C. auris. Preliminary research is being conducted to assess the growth of C. auris as well as other Candida species and their utilization of various carbon and nitrogen sources. Spectrophotometry absorbance values and hemocytometer cell counts were used to identify the growth of the yeast and ease in quantification of population values. These tests will provide data to aid in the proper identification of C. auris. Continual research will consist of using essential oils to test the efficacy and potential synergism, which includes the interaction between the yeast and the essential oils in an effort to find treatment against C. auris infections.

Project Type

Poster

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Characterization of Candida auris a novel drug resistant fungal pathogen

Candida auris is an emerging fungal pathogen first documented in Asia that has since spread rapidly in healthcare facilities across the world, resulting in serious infections, some of which have been fatal. C. auris, is an invasive yeast species that has been found to be resistant to all three of the major classes of antifungal drugs. The doses required to kill the pathogen with these antifungals are toxic to humans. There is little information about C. auris in the databases of commercial identification systems, leading to C. auris to be often misidentified for C. haemulonii and Rhodotorula glutinis, yeasts that C. auris shares biochemical identification markers with. Misidentification of the pathogen can lead to an improper course of treatment as well as difficulties controlling outbreaks within hospitals. The Bioinnovation Lab of Kennesaw State University has been working to find ways to properly identify and treat C. auris. Preliminary research is being conducted to assess the growth of C. auris as well as other Candida species and their utilization of various carbon and nitrogen sources. Spectrophotometry absorbance values and hemocytometer cell counts were used to identify the growth of the yeast and ease in quantification of population values. These tests will provide data to aid in the proper identification of C. auris. Continual research will consist of using essential oils to test the efficacy and potential synergism, which includes the interaction between the yeast and the essential oils in an effort to find treatment against C. auris infections.