Project Title

Learning While Flying – A Simulation Based Case Study

Presenters

Academic department under which the project should be listed

SPCEET - Industrial and Systems Engineering

Faculty Sponsor Name

Adeel Khalid

Additional Faculty

Ayse Tekes, Mechanical Engineering, atekes@kennesaw.edu

Abstract (300 words maximum)

In this study, student learning and retention is assessed using a motion-based fixed wing flight simulator. Students are given an introduction to the principles of flight, fly the aircraft flight simulator, and complete a pre-defined mission. Points are given for successfully completing several legs of the mission. Four separate and independent groups of students are recruited for the study. Group A is presented with written literature to review before the flight. Group B is given a short presentation which describes flight controls, basic instruments, and the mission. Group C is presented with both the literature for review ahead of time and is given a short presentation before the flight. Group D, is presented flight information through video. All four groups are asked to fly the exact same mission. Students are graded based on their flight performance, handling and control of the aircraft during the flight. The flight is composed of starting a single engine land-based aircraft, taking off while staying centered on the runway, going upwind to an altitude of 1,000ft above the ground level, performing a left traffic pattern including crosswind, downwind, base and final legs. Scores for these four groups are compared. If it is observed that any one of the chosen modalities e.g. lectures, pre-reading or hands-on training is more effective than others, then it can be concluded that instructors teaching material similar to the ones used in this study could apply that modality more often than other modalities to improve learning.

Project Type

Poster

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Learning While Flying – A Simulation Based Case Study

In this study, student learning and retention is assessed using a motion-based fixed wing flight simulator. Students are given an introduction to the principles of flight, fly the aircraft flight simulator, and complete a pre-defined mission. Points are given for successfully completing several legs of the mission. Four separate and independent groups of students are recruited for the study. Group A is presented with written literature to review before the flight. Group B is given a short presentation which describes flight controls, basic instruments, and the mission. Group C is presented with both the literature for review ahead of time and is given a short presentation before the flight. Group D, is presented flight information through video. All four groups are asked to fly the exact same mission. Students are graded based on their flight performance, handling and control of the aircraft during the flight. The flight is composed of starting a single engine land-based aircraft, taking off while staying centered on the runway, going upwind to an altitude of 1,000ft above the ground level, performing a left traffic pattern including crosswind, downwind, base and final legs. Scores for these four groups are compared. If it is observed that any one of the chosen modalities e.g. lectures, pre-reading or hands-on training is more effective than others, then it can be concluded that instructors teaching material similar to the ones used in this study could apply that modality more often than other modalities to improve learning.