Project Title

Childhood Emotional Abuse and Alcohol Use in Young Adults

Presenters

Academic department under which the project should be listed

RCHSS - Psychological Science

Faculty Sponsor Name

Ebony Glover

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Childhood emotional abuse (i.e., sustained exposure to psychological maltreatment from caregivers) has been linked to depression, anxiety and problematic alcohol use in later life. However, there is limited understanding of neurobiological factors leading to these adverse outcomes. The acoustic startle response is a reflex that is modulated by neural systems implicated in emotion regulation. The goal of the current study is to examine the relationships among childhood emotional abuse, alcohol use, and acoustic startle response in college students. Participants were recruited from Kennesaw State University’s Research Participation System. They completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) and the Kreek McHugh Schluger Kellogg scale (KMSK scale). KMSK measures the overall degree of self-exposure (frequency, duration, and amount) of alcohol during the period of time when an individual is drinking the most. It is hypothesized that individuals with higher exposure to childhood emotional abuse will report higher alcohol use and show higher startle responses. Such findings could contribute to identifying the neurobiological mechanisms linking childhood maltreatment with later alcohol use in young adults.

Project Type

Poster

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Childhood Emotional Abuse and Alcohol Use in Young Adults

Childhood emotional abuse (i.e., sustained exposure to psychological maltreatment from caregivers) has been linked to depression, anxiety and problematic alcohol use in later life. However, there is limited understanding of neurobiological factors leading to these adverse outcomes. The acoustic startle response is a reflex that is modulated by neural systems implicated in emotion regulation. The goal of the current study is to examine the relationships among childhood emotional abuse, alcohol use, and acoustic startle response in college students. Participants were recruited from Kennesaw State University’s Research Participation System. They completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) and the Kreek McHugh Schluger Kellogg scale (KMSK scale). KMSK measures the overall degree of self-exposure (frequency, duration, and amount) of alcohol during the period of time when an individual is drinking the most. It is hypothesized that individuals with higher exposure to childhood emotional abuse will report higher alcohol use and show higher startle responses. Such findings could contribute to identifying the neurobiological mechanisms linking childhood maltreatment with later alcohol use in young adults.