Project Title

The Intergroup Sensitivity Effect Among Racial Groups

Presenters

Academic department under which the project should be listed

RCHSS - Psychological Science

Faculty Sponsor Name

Dr. Katherine White

Abstract (300 words maximum)

The Intergroup Sensitivity Effect (ISE) is the tendency for people to respond more negatively when their group is criticized by an outgroup versus an ingroup member. The ISE has been demonstrated for nationality and profession, but not race. The present studies sought to replicate the ISE across racial groups. In experiment 1 (N = 248), participants responded to praise or criticism of their ingroup delivered by an ingroup or outgroup member. Criticism from an outgroup speaker was more negatively received than criticism delivered by an ingroup speaker. Feelings toward the racial outgroup did not influence reactions to criticism. Unexpectedly, White participants responded more positively to praise delivered by an outgroup member (reverse ISE). Experiment 2 (N = 272) used a similar design to further probe the “reverse ISE”. Participants read comments of praise delivered by an ingroup or outgroup member. The “reverse ISE” was absent among Black participants, but replicated for White participants for both Black and Asian outgroup speakers. This effect was moderated by participants’ motivation to avoid prejudice for the Asian outgroup speaker. These studies replicate the ISE for racial groups and reveal a unique effect that has not been observed in previous ISE research (reverse ISE).

Project Type

Poster

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The Intergroup Sensitivity Effect Among Racial Groups

The Intergroup Sensitivity Effect (ISE) is the tendency for people to respond more negatively when their group is criticized by an outgroup versus an ingroup member. The ISE has been demonstrated for nationality and profession, but not race. The present studies sought to replicate the ISE across racial groups. In experiment 1 (N = 248), participants responded to praise or criticism of their ingroup delivered by an ingroup or outgroup member. Criticism from an outgroup speaker was more negatively received than criticism delivered by an ingroup speaker. Feelings toward the racial outgroup did not influence reactions to criticism. Unexpectedly, White participants responded more positively to praise delivered by an outgroup member (reverse ISE). Experiment 2 (N = 272) used a similar design to further probe the “reverse ISE”. Participants read comments of praise delivered by an ingroup or outgroup member. The “reverse ISE” was absent among Black participants, but replicated for White participants for both Black and Asian outgroup speakers. This effect was moderated by participants’ motivation to avoid prejudice for the Asian outgroup speaker. These studies replicate the ISE for racial groups and reveal a unique effect that has not been observed in previous ISE research (reverse ISE).