Project Title

New developments in the chemistry of polyNHCs: Synthesis and coordination

Presenters

Academic department under which the project should be listed

CSM - Chemistry and Biochemistry

Faculty Sponsor Name

Daniela Tapu

No approval required

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Since the isolation of the first stable carbene by Arduengo in 1991, N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) have emerged as a very useful type of ligands for homogeneous catalyst design, due to their high topological and electronic versatility, as well as a great coordination capability. The majority of known NHCs are either monofunctional or difunctional with tethered carbenes poised for chelation to a single metal center. Essential to the advancement of NHC-based materials has been the design and synthesis of new systems featuring multiple NHC moieties capable of functioning independently of each other. These multitopic NHCs are not only structurally fascinating, but could also function as building block for accessing new classes of polymers, as self-assembled materials and recyclable catalysts. The synthesis of several new classes of polyNHCs will be presented. Details on the chemistry of these carbenes with respect to their ability to support catalytically relevant metal complexes will be provided.

Project Type

Poster

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

New developments in the chemistry of polyNHCs: Synthesis and coordination

Since the isolation of the first stable carbene by Arduengo in 1991, N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) have emerged as a very useful type of ligands for homogeneous catalyst design, due to their high topological and electronic versatility, as well as a great coordination capability. The majority of known NHCs are either monofunctional or difunctional with tethered carbenes poised for chelation to a single metal center. Essential to the advancement of NHC-based materials has been the design and synthesis of new systems featuring multiple NHC moieties capable of functioning independently of each other. These multitopic NHCs are not only structurally fascinating, but could also function as building block for accessing new classes of polymers, as self-assembled materials and recyclable catalysts. The synthesis of several new classes of polyNHCs will be presented. Details on the chemistry of these carbenes with respect to their ability to support catalytically relevant metal complexes will be provided.