Project Title

Thermal Stabilities of Foodborne Pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Thompson and Bacteriophage ΦEnt

Presenters

Academic department under which the project should be listed

CSM - Molecular and Cellular Biology

Faculty Sponsor Name

Jean Lu

We do not use human subjects

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Salmonella are a group of bacterial pathogens frequently causing foodborne illness. Effective control of Salmonella is important to improve food safety. Bacteriophages or phages (viruses that attack bacteria) have emerged as promising biocontrol agents against bacterial pathogens. To effectively use phages to control Salmonella, the thermal stabilities of both Salmonella and phages need to be investigated. The objective of this study is to evaluate the thermal stabilities of Salmonella enterica serovar Thompson and phage ΦEnt (attacking the Salmonella) at various temperatures. The thermal stabilities of S. Thompson and ΦEnt were measured in water baths at 37, 50, 63, and 72°C. Samples were taken at 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 4 minutes. Cell and phage concentrations were estimated using plate count method and plaque assay, respectively. The results showed that S. Thompson and ΦEnt were stable at 37°C. At 50°C, cell concentration remained unchanged while phage concentration decreased about 1.5 log units within 1 min and slightly decreased thereafter. At 63°C, cell concentration decreased 1-log unit within 1 min, and dropped below the detection limit within 3 min. In contrast, phage concentration decreased 2.5 log units within 30 sec, and decreased slowly thereafter. At 72°C, cell concentration quickly dropped below the detection limit within 30 sec while phage concentration decreased much slower. In conclusions, the thermal stabilities of Salmonella Thompson and phage ΦEnt vary with the temperature over the time. The study provided valuable data for the application of phage ΦEnt as a biocontrol agent against Salmonella Thompson at various temperatures.

Project Type

Poster

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Thermal Stabilities of Foodborne Pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Thompson and Bacteriophage ΦEnt

Salmonella are a group of bacterial pathogens frequently causing foodborne illness. Effective control of Salmonella is important to improve food safety. Bacteriophages or phages (viruses that attack bacteria) have emerged as promising biocontrol agents against bacterial pathogens. To effectively use phages to control Salmonella, the thermal stabilities of both Salmonella and phages need to be investigated. The objective of this study is to evaluate the thermal stabilities of Salmonella enterica serovar Thompson and phage ΦEnt (attacking the Salmonella) at various temperatures. The thermal stabilities of S. Thompson and ΦEnt were measured in water baths at 37, 50, 63, and 72°C. Samples were taken at 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 4 minutes. Cell and phage concentrations were estimated using plate count method and plaque assay, respectively. The results showed that S. Thompson and ΦEnt were stable at 37°C. At 50°C, cell concentration remained unchanged while phage concentration decreased about 1.5 log units within 1 min and slightly decreased thereafter. At 63°C, cell concentration decreased 1-log unit within 1 min, and dropped below the detection limit within 3 min. In contrast, phage concentration decreased 2.5 log units within 30 sec, and decreased slowly thereafter. At 72°C, cell concentration quickly dropped below the detection limit within 30 sec while phage concentration decreased much slower. In conclusions, the thermal stabilities of Salmonella Thompson and phage ΦEnt vary with the temperature over the time. The study provided valuable data for the application of phage ΦEnt as a biocontrol agent against Salmonella Thompson at various temperatures.