Project Title

Aroma Profiling of Hops Using GC-MS and SPME

Presenters

Academic department under which the project should be listed

CSM - Chemistry and Biochemistry

Faculty Sponsor Name

Dr. Chris Cornelison

Additional Faculty

Dr. Kyle Gabriel, Office of Research, kgabrie5@kennesaw.edu

Abstract (300 words maximum)

One goal of this research is to determine if the aroma profile of hops (Humulus lupulus) change after processing from flowers to pellets. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS) and solid-phase microextraction (SPME) will be used to determine aroma profiles of flowers and the pellets produced from those flowers by Hopsteiner (https://www.hopsteiner.com/), a leading provider of hops to the global brewing industry. Hop flowers (Image 1) are selected by brewers using organoleptic methods. The flowers are then ground up and pressed into hop pellets (Image 2) for long-term storage and transport. The process of making pellets has the potential to change the aroma profile originally perceived by the brewers. Whole female hop flowers are used mainly in the dry hopping process, to add aromas and flavors to the beer without adding bitterness. Hops are pelletized because the pellets have a higher extraction efficiency than whole hops. The pellets release more essential oils creating more bitterness in the final product. Pellets are also easier to work with and are more stable. The hop flowers are not boiled during dry-hopping, therefore do not emit as many oils that cause bitterness. One example of a hop oil that changes the aroma and flavor of beer is pinene, which is associated with a spicy or piney characteristic.

Project Type

Poster

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Aroma Profiling of Hops Using GC-MS and SPME

One goal of this research is to determine if the aroma profile of hops (Humulus lupulus) change after processing from flowers to pellets. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS) and solid-phase microextraction (SPME) will be used to determine aroma profiles of flowers and the pellets produced from those flowers by Hopsteiner (https://www.hopsteiner.com/), a leading provider of hops to the global brewing industry. Hop flowers (Image 1) are selected by brewers using organoleptic methods. The flowers are then ground up and pressed into hop pellets (Image 2) for long-term storage and transport. The process of making pellets has the potential to change the aroma profile originally perceived by the brewers. Whole female hop flowers are used mainly in the dry hopping process, to add aromas and flavors to the beer without adding bitterness. Hops are pelletized because the pellets have a higher extraction efficiency than whole hops. The pellets release more essential oils creating more bitterness in the final product. Pellets are also easier to work with and are more stable. The hop flowers are not boiled during dry-hopping, therefore do not emit as many oils that cause bitterness. One example of a hop oil that changes the aroma and flavor of beer is pinene, which is associated with a spicy or piney characteristic.