Project Title

The Relationship between Motion Offset and Neural Inhibition with respect to EEG

Presenters

Academic department under which the project should be listed

RCHSS - Psychological Science

Faculty Sponsor Name

Dr. Tim Martin

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Abstract

As part of a study of whether motion offset reflects neural inhibition, subjects were asked to perform the stop signal paradigm and a motion direction discrimination task while EEG was recorded. Here I report the analysis of the stop signal evoked response potential. In this experiment, 11 subjects were presented with a stimulus (x or an o) and asked to respond. On some trials they were presented with a stop signal and their ability to withhold their response was recorded. If the subject successfully stopped at the given signal, the delay in signal presentation was increased, and this step procedure was followed until the participant was no longer able to hold their response. After the data had been collected, the evoked response potential for both the target and stop signals were analyzed. No relationship was found between the stopping ability and the latency of the N2 component of the target evoked response potential. The results are discussed with respect to the stop signal paradigm and inhibition.

Project Type

Poster

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

The Relationship between Motion Offset and Neural Inhibition with respect to EEG

Abstract

As part of a study of whether motion offset reflects neural inhibition, subjects were asked to perform the stop signal paradigm and a motion direction discrimination task while EEG was recorded. Here I report the analysis of the stop signal evoked response potential. In this experiment, 11 subjects were presented with a stimulus (x or an o) and asked to respond. On some trials they were presented with a stop signal and their ability to withhold their response was recorded. If the subject successfully stopped at the given signal, the delay in signal presentation was increased, and this step procedure was followed until the participant was no longer able to hold their response. After the data had been collected, the evoked response potential for both the target and stop signals were analyzed. No relationship was found between the stopping ability and the latency of the N2 component of the target evoked response potential. The results are discussed with respect to the stop signal paradigm and inhibition.