Project Title

Design of Binary Composite Materials Containing Nanostructured TiO2 and Plasmonic Nanoparticles on Cotton Fabric: Photocatalytic Applications

Presenters

Academic department under which the project should be listed

CSM - Chemistry and Biochemistry

Faculty Sponsor Name

Dr. Bharat Baruah

Does not involve human subjects!

Abstract (300 words maximum)

In this study, we will design composite materials containing nanosized TiO2 and plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs). Cotton fabric will be utilized as a solid support to generate binary (TiO2-NP) NP. TiO2 nanostructures will be immobilized on cotton fabric by using hydrothermal methods. Plasmonic nanoparticles will be synthesized using ex-situ methods and will be surface modified. Finally, binary materials will be created by dip-coating or drop-casting colloidal nanoparticles. The composite materials will be characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy-dispersive X-ray, Raman spectroscopy, XRD and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The photocatalytic degradation of model dye molecules will be monitored by UV-visible spectroscopy.

Project Type

Poster

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Design of Binary Composite Materials Containing Nanostructured TiO2 and Plasmonic Nanoparticles on Cotton Fabric: Photocatalytic Applications

In this study, we will design composite materials containing nanosized TiO2 and plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs). Cotton fabric will be utilized as a solid support to generate binary (TiO2-NP) NP. TiO2 nanostructures will be immobilized on cotton fabric by using hydrothermal methods. Plasmonic nanoparticles will be synthesized using ex-situ methods and will be surface modified. Finally, binary materials will be created by dip-coating or drop-casting colloidal nanoparticles. The composite materials will be characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy-dispersive X-ray, Raman spectroscopy, XRD and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The photocatalytic degradation of model dye molecules will be monitored by UV-visible spectroscopy.