Project Title

Age Does Not Attenuate Maximal Strength and Acceleration Adaptations To Unilateral Resistance Training

Presenters

Faculty Sponsor Name

Garrett Hester, Ph.D.

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Purpose: To identify the effects of unilateral resistance training (RT) on peak torque (PT) and acceleration (ACC) at low and high velocitiesin the trained and untrained limb of young and older males. Methods: Twenty-two untrained, young (YG; age = 21.43 ± 2.29 yrs) and nineteen older (OG; age = 65.78 ± 9.83 yrs) males performed unilateral RT of the knee extensors for 3 sessions/week for 4 weeks. RT consisted of maximal concentric knee extensions at 45°·s-1 with an emphasis on ballistic intent for 4 sets of 10 repetitions. Three maximal contractions were recorded before (PRE) and after week 4 (POST) to measure PT and ACC at 45°s-1 (PT45 and ACC45, respectively), and 300°s-1 (PT300 and ACC300, respectively).

Results: No group ´ time interactions existed, so the main effects for time were examined. For the untrained leg, PT45 (+3.7%; p = 0.227)remained unchanged whereas ACC45 (+2.7%; p = 0.021), PT300 (+6.2%; p = 0.008), and ACC300 (+3.8%; p = 0.016)increased at POST. For the trained leg, PT45 (+7.4%; p = 0.050), ACC45 (+4.0%; p = 0.009), PT300 (+6.3%; p = 0.001), and ACC300 (+2.3%; p = 0.007)improved at POST.

Conclusion: Age had no effect on the adaptations in the trained leg. The untrained limb only saw increases in PT at 300°s-1 and ACC at the low and high velocity. Unilateral RT involving a ballistic attempt may be more conducive to cross-education of rapid or high velocity contractile parameters as compared to changes in low velocity strength.

Project Type

Poster

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Age Does Not Attenuate Maximal Strength and Acceleration Adaptations To Unilateral Resistance Training

Purpose: To identify the effects of unilateral resistance training (RT) on peak torque (PT) and acceleration (ACC) at low and high velocitiesin the trained and untrained limb of young and older males. Methods: Twenty-two untrained, young (YG; age = 21.43 ± 2.29 yrs) and nineteen older (OG; age = 65.78 ± 9.83 yrs) males performed unilateral RT of the knee extensors for 3 sessions/week for 4 weeks. RT consisted of maximal concentric knee extensions at 45°·s-1 with an emphasis on ballistic intent for 4 sets of 10 repetitions. Three maximal contractions were recorded before (PRE) and after week 4 (POST) to measure PT and ACC at 45°s-1 (PT45 and ACC45, respectively), and 300°s-1 (PT300 and ACC300, respectively).

Results: No group ´ time interactions existed, so the main effects for time were examined. For the untrained leg, PT45 (+3.7%; p = 0.227)remained unchanged whereas ACC45 (+2.7%; p = 0.021), PT300 (+6.2%; p = 0.008), and ACC300 (+3.8%; p = 0.016)increased at POST. For the trained leg, PT45 (+7.4%; p = 0.050), ACC45 (+4.0%; p = 0.009), PT300 (+6.3%; p = 0.001), and ACC300 (+2.3%; p = 0.007)improved at POST.

Conclusion: Age had no effect on the adaptations in the trained leg. The untrained limb only saw increases in PT at 300°s-1 and ACC at the low and high velocity. Unilateral RT involving a ballistic attempt may be more conducive to cross-education of rapid or high velocity contractile parameters as compared to changes in low velocity strength.