Project Title

RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN 40-M SPRINTING AND VERTICAL JUMP KINETICS IN NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE (NFL) DRAFT PROSPECTS

Presenters

Faculty Sponsor Name

Gerald Mangine

Additional Faculty

Trisha VanDusseldorp, Exercise Science, tvanduss@kennesaw.edu Yuri Feito, Exercise Science, yfeito@kennesaw.edu

Abstract (300 words maximum)

To determine the relationships between 40-m sprinting and vertical jump (VJ) kinetics, twenty-six NFL draft prospects (22.7±1.0 years; 186.5±7.9 cm; 109.3±23.6kg) completed assessments at the beginning of their off-season. After a standardized warm-up, the athletes completed a maximal 40-m sprint trial while tethered to a robotic sprinting device (RSD) at 1-kg resistance, and a second, untethered trial for time (in seconds). Subsequently, three maximal VJ trials were completed while tethered to a linear position transducer. Peak (PK) and average (AVG) velocity (V), force (F), and power (P) were measured during the 40-m sprint and VJ, as well as VJ displacement and average partial power (PPAVG) and force (PFAVG). Pearson’s correlation analysis revealed VJ displacement was related (p<0.05) to sprinting time (r = –0.47 to – 0.63), VAVG (r = 0.70), FAVG (r = 0.45) and PAVG (r = 0.62). VJ VPK was related (p<0.05) to sprinting time (r = –0.48), velocity (r = 0.50 – 0.52), force (r = 0.42), and power (r = 0.48). VJ PAVG was related (p<0.05) to sprinting time (r = 0.63), velocity (r = –0.44 to –0.58), force (r = –0.39) and power (r = –0.51). VJ PPAVG was related (p<0.05) to sprinting time (r = 0.46) and PVAVG (r = –0.45). VJ PFAVG was related (p<0.05) to sprinting time (r = 0.49 – 0.63), VAVG (r = –0.55) and PAVG (r = –0.43). No other relationships were observed. VJ displacement and velocity positively influence 40-m sprinting performance, while VJ force and power may have a negative impact.

Project Type

Poster

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RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN 40-M SPRINTING AND VERTICAL JUMP KINETICS IN NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE (NFL) DRAFT PROSPECTS

To determine the relationships between 40-m sprinting and vertical jump (VJ) kinetics, twenty-six NFL draft prospects (22.7±1.0 years; 186.5±7.9 cm; 109.3±23.6kg) completed assessments at the beginning of their off-season. After a standardized warm-up, the athletes completed a maximal 40-m sprint trial while tethered to a robotic sprinting device (RSD) at 1-kg resistance, and a second, untethered trial for time (in seconds). Subsequently, three maximal VJ trials were completed while tethered to a linear position transducer. Peak (PK) and average (AVG) velocity (V), force (F), and power (P) were measured during the 40-m sprint and VJ, as well as VJ displacement and average partial power (PPAVG) and force (PFAVG). Pearson’s correlation analysis revealed VJ displacement was related (p<0.05) to sprinting time (r = –0.47 to – 0.63), VAVG (r = 0.70), FAVG (r = 0.45) and PAVG (r = 0.62). VJ VPK was related (p<0.05) to sprinting time (r = –0.48), velocity (r = 0.50 – 0.52), force (r = 0.42), and power (r = 0.48). VJ PAVG was related (p<0.05) to sprinting time (r = 0.63), velocity (r = –0.44 to –0.58), force (r = –0.39) and power (r = –0.51). VJ PPAVG was related (p<0.05) to sprinting time (r = 0.46) and PVAVG (r = –0.45). VJ PFAVG was related (p<0.05) to sprinting time (r = 0.49 – 0.63), VAVG (r = –0.55) and PAVG (r = –0.43). No other relationships were observed. VJ displacement and velocity positively influence 40-m sprinting performance, while VJ force and power may have a negative impact.