Project Title

Understanding the Regulation and Activity of Hyaluronidase Produced by Aeromonads

Presenters

Academic department under which the project should be listed

CSM - Molecular and Cellular Biology

Faculty Sponsor Name

Dr. Donald J. McGarey

Additional Faculty

Pyeongsug Kim: pkim@kennesaw.edu

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Hyaluronidases (HAase) are enzymes produced by a number of organisms, including bacteria, that degrade the substrate hyaluronan (HA). Hyaluronan is a polysaccharide, specifically a glycosaminoglycan, widely present in soft tissue of animals. In nature, the degradation of HA by a bacterial hyaluronidase is to use HA as a carbon and nitrogen source; however, HAase enhance tissue destruction and spread of infection by pathogens. Aeromonas are waterborne bacterial pathogens that cause diseases including gastroenteritis, wound infections, and acute necrotizing fasciitis. An initial screen of five different species showed the presence of a putative HAase gene in Aeromonas hydrophila, A. salmonicida, A. veronii, and A. aquariorum, but not A. bestarium. Although most Aeromonas strains were positive for the HAase gene, very few demonstrated phenotypic HAase activity (no HA degradation). Only one strain, A. hydrophilia 1280, displayed HA degradation regardless of condition. It has become apparent that an understanding of the regulatory elements controlling HAase expression and activity for aeromonads is lacking, and therefore the objective of this study. To date it appears that expression of HAase is independent of glucose availability; however, other growth medium constituents seem to influence activity and are under investigation. In addition to medium components, control of gene expression by quorum sensing and the possible role of metal co-factors in enzyme activity are under investigation. Understanding the regulation and activity of Aeromonas HAase will be important to understanding the mechanisms leading to tissue destruction and spread of infection as a means of preventing progression and severity of disease.

Project Type

Poster

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Understanding the Regulation and Activity of Hyaluronidase Produced by Aeromonads

Hyaluronidases (HAase) are enzymes produced by a number of organisms, including bacteria, that degrade the substrate hyaluronan (HA). Hyaluronan is a polysaccharide, specifically a glycosaminoglycan, widely present in soft tissue of animals. In nature, the degradation of HA by a bacterial hyaluronidase is to use HA as a carbon and nitrogen source; however, HAase enhance tissue destruction and spread of infection by pathogens. Aeromonas are waterborne bacterial pathogens that cause diseases including gastroenteritis, wound infections, and acute necrotizing fasciitis. An initial screen of five different species showed the presence of a putative HAase gene in Aeromonas hydrophila, A. salmonicida, A. veronii, and A. aquariorum, but not A. bestarium. Although most Aeromonas strains were positive for the HAase gene, very few demonstrated phenotypic HAase activity (no HA degradation). Only one strain, A. hydrophilia 1280, displayed HA degradation regardless of condition. It has become apparent that an understanding of the regulatory elements controlling HAase expression and activity for aeromonads is lacking, and therefore the objective of this study. To date it appears that expression of HAase is independent of glucose availability; however, other growth medium constituents seem to influence activity and are under investigation. In addition to medium components, control of gene expression by quorum sensing and the possible role of metal co-factors in enzyme activity are under investigation. Understanding the regulation and activity of Aeromonas HAase will be important to understanding the mechanisms leading to tissue destruction and spread of infection as a means of preventing progression and severity of disease.