Project Title

Determining the Cognitive Load of a Virtual Substrate Docking Activity in Biochemistry

Presenters

Academic department under which the project should be listed

CSM - Chemistry and Biochemistry

Faculty Sponsor Name

Kimberly Cortes

Additional Faculty

Adriane Randolph, Information Systems, arandol3@kennesaw.edu

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Understanding how students learn and process information in biochemistry is critical to developing physical and virtual modeling activities that facilitate student learning while also decreasing cognitive load. To meet this goal, research was conducted to identify the cognitive elements connected to a virtual modeling activity in biochemistry. Using EEG (electrocephalogram) and eye tracking technologies, researchers measured and recorded the cognitive processing of student participants while they were asked to manipulate and answer questions about during a substrate docking virtual modeling laboratory. Analysis of this data will provide information necessary to develop curriculum that does not undermine student learning because of excessive cognitive load.

Project Type

Oral Presentation (15-min time slots)

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Determining the Cognitive Load of a Virtual Substrate Docking Activity in Biochemistry

Understanding how students learn and process information in biochemistry is critical to developing physical and virtual modeling activities that facilitate student learning while also decreasing cognitive load. To meet this goal, research was conducted to identify the cognitive elements connected to a virtual modeling activity in biochemistry. Using EEG (electrocephalogram) and eye tracking technologies, researchers measured and recorded the cognitive processing of student participants while they were asked to manipulate and answer questions about during a substrate docking virtual modeling laboratory. Analysis of this data will provide information necessary to develop curriculum that does not undermine student learning because of excessive cognitive load.