Project Title

Misogyny in American Culture: A Case Study on Radio and Journalism

Presenters

Academic department under which the project should be listed

RCHSS - Interdisciplinary Studies

Faculty Sponsor Name

Letizia Guglielmo

This project does not involve research with human participants.

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Misogyny finds itself deeply rooted in the fields of radio and journalism with implications for both professionals within these fields and the audiences who are influenced by their content. Contributing to a two-volume set of references essays exploring misogyny in American culture, researchers explored the history, current trends, impacts, and responses to misogyny in radio and journalism, identifying primary forms of misogyny that involve a dislike of, contempt for, or ingrained prejudice against women that often results in devaluing or slandering women for entertainment purposes, devaluing women’s professional abilities, and distrust of women as reliable resources of information. Researchers also discovered that the education of emerging journalists plays a significant role in shaping the content that is covered, sidelining and silencing subjects such as human rights, abortion, and lifestyle. In radio, for example, there remains clear sexism in the form of shock jocks like Don Imus and Rush Limbaugh. Recognizing that expressed bias against women and sexism remains evident in professional attitudes and behaviors in these fields, presenters will outline the far reaching and persistent impacts of this misogyny. Women, for example, still face sexual harassment and assault in the workplace, and digital and social media have facilitated both new forums for women’s voices as well as backlash in the form of online trolls. Responses to this misogyny, as presenters will explain, include female led news sites, magazines, radio shows, and podcasts as well as increased efforts to document and publicize the number of women working within various media.

Project Type

Oral Presentation (15-min time slots)

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Misogyny in American Culture: A Case Study on Radio and Journalism

Misogyny finds itself deeply rooted in the fields of radio and journalism with implications for both professionals within these fields and the audiences who are influenced by their content. Contributing to a two-volume set of references essays exploring misogyny in American culture, researchers explored the history, current trends, impacts, and responses to misogyny in radio and journalism, identifying primary forms of misogyny that involve a dislike of, contempt for, or ingrained prejudice against women that often results in devaluing or slandering women for entertainment purposes, devaluing women’s professional abilities, and distrust of women as reliable resources of information. Researchers also discovered that the education of emerging journalists plays a significant role in shaping the content that is covered, sidelining and silencing subjects such as human rights, abortion, and lifestyle. In radio, for example, there remains clear sexism in the form of shock jocks like Don Imus and Rush Limbaugh. Recognizing that expressed bias against women and sexism remains evident in professional attitudes and behaviors in these fields, presenters will outline the far reaching and persistent impacts of this misogyny. Women, for example, still face sexual harassment and assault in the workplace, and digital and social media have facilitated both new forums for women’s voices as well as backlash in the form of online trolls. Responses to this misogyny, as presenters will explain, include female led news sites, magazines, radio shows, and podcasts as well as increased efforts to document and publicize the number of women working within various media.