Project Title

Cyber Security of American Nuclear Facilities

Presenters

Academic department under which the project should be listed

SPCEET - Industrial and Systems Engineering

Faculty Sponsor Name

Eduardo Farfan

Additional Faculty

Dr. Jungkyu Park, Mechanical Engineering, jpark186@kennesaw.edu Dr. Tien Mun Yee, Civil and Construction Engineering, tyee@kennesaw.edu

I am not working with human or animal subjects.

Abstract (300 words maximum)

In June 2017 the automatic radiation monitoring system at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) located in Ukraine was compromised by a worldwide cyberattack, forcing the plant workers to conduct radiation monitoring manually. The ChNPP was the site of the worst nuclear reactor disaster when Unit 4 exploded in 1986. Ukrainian authorities indicated that the monitoring system’s operating system was breached by the cyberattack. This study presents: 1) the past and current cyberattack threats and their potential consequences for stakeholders in the U.S. nuclear industry and the public, 2) systems currently in place to defend against such threats, 3) specific measures that should be considered to improve the quality of cyber defense systems, and 4) government regulations regarding cybersecurity in the nuclear industry. Analysis was conducted from a holistic, systems-thinking approach and considerations were entertained for all stakeholders, system elements, signifiers, and affordances.

Project Type

Oral Presentation (15-min time slots)

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Cyber Security of American Nuclear Facilities

In June 2017 the automatic radiation monitoring system at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) located in Ukraine was compromised by a worldwide cyberattack, forcing the plant workers to conduct radiation monitoring manually. The ChNPP was the site of the worst nuclear reactor disaster when Unit 4 exploded in 1986. Ukrainian authorities indicated that the monitoring system’s operating system was breached by the cyberattack. This study presents: 1) the past and current cyberattack threats and their potential consequences for stakeholders in the U.S. nuclear industry and the public, 2) systems currently in place to defend against such threats, 3) specific measures that should be considered to improve the quality of cyber defense systems, and 4) government regulations regarding cybersecurity in the nuclear industry. Analysis was conducted from a holistic, systems-thinking approach and considerations were entertained for all stakeholders, system elements, signifiers, and affordances.