Project Title

Live Gamma Ray Camera

Presenters

Academic department under which the project should be listed

SPCEET - Mechanical Engineering

Faculty Sponsor Name

Eduardo Farfan

no human subjects

Abstract (300 words maximum)

The only detection technologies currently available that generate an image offer either only a still image whose film must be removed and developed or a video image using a cost-prohibitive camera, the weight of which can limit its portability and functionality. No cost effective and reasonably mobile solutions for gamma imaging exist. Such a technology has wide range of possible applications including, but not limited to, shipping container safety scanning, nuclear contamination evaluation, nuclear medicine, non-destructive testing, and general nuclear physics research. By leveraging the existing technology such as digital dental X-ray sensors, a live video gamma detector could be developed using a pinhole camera construction. The pinhole camera must be constructed of a material that would not permit gamma radiation to penetrate the camera structure outside the pinhole. The material of choice for this use is tungsten. Considering tungsten’s cost prototyping would be extremely budget-limited. Therefore, simulation and refinement of the design is essential. The physical characteristics of a tungsten pinhole camera structure, including the wall thickness, pinhole shape, seam type, alloy type, and more as well as the energy level, total flux, and distribution of radiation sources will all be varied in simulation software known as MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code). Research was conducted to determine and refine parameters like the highest angle of the pinhole that results in an acceptable amount of ‘leakage’ through the thin portion of the hole while still maintaining reasonable front panel thickness, back and side plane thickness, and different seam types.

Project Type

Oral Presentation (15-min time slots)

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Live Gamma Ray Camera

The only detection technologies currently available that generate an image offer either only a still image whose film must be removed and developed or a video image using a cost-prohibitive camera, the weight of which can limit its portability and functionality. No cost effective and reasonably mobile solutions for gamma imaging exist. Such a technology has wide range of possible applications including, but not limited to, shipping container safety scanning, nuclear contamination evaluation, nuclear medicine, non-destructive testing, and general nuclear physics research. By leveraging the existing technology such as digital dental X-ray sensors, a live video gamma detector could be developed using a pinhole camera construction. The pinhole camera must be constructed of a material that would not permit gamma radiation to penetrate the camera structure outside the pinhole. The material of choice for this use is tungsten. Considering tungsten’s cost prototyping would be extremely budget-limited. Therefore, simulation and refinement of the design is essential. The physical characteristics of a tungsten pinhole camera structure, including the wall thickness, pinhole shape, seam type, alloy type, and more as well as the energy level, total flux, and distribution of radiation sources will all be varied in simulation software known as MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code). Research was conducted to determine and refine parameters like the highest angle of the pinhole that results in an acceptable amount of ‘leakage’ through the thin portion of the hole while still maintaining reasonable front panel thickness, back and side plane thickness, and different seam types.