Project Title

Me, Myself, and They: The Use of Non-Binary Gender Language in Steven Universe

Presenters

Academic department under which the project should be listed

RCHSS - English

Faculty Sponsor Name

Jeanne Bohannon

I am doing a textual analysis of a show, therefore, no IRB is required.

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Because of the decreasing number of people identifying with cis-gender identity and the need for multiple gender inclusion within children's television shows, I will analyze the linguistic phenomena of non-binary gender representation within the context of Cartoon Network's production Steven Universe. Through a textual analysis of this production, I will examine the language used and determine if the linguistic message, gender inclusivity, is clear to the audience. This research is important because of the cultural struggle our society faces in understanding and representing non-binary gender identity. The importance of understanding non-binary gender constructs cannot be understated, and Rebecca Sugar, the first female show-runner for Cartoon Network and creator of Steven Universe, understands the significance of her work. At the 2016 San Diego Comic Con, Rebecca stated, “It really makes a difference to hear stories about how someone like you can be loved. And if you don’t hear those stories, it will change who you are."

Project Type

Oral Presentation (15-min time slots)

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Me, Myself, and They: The Use of Non-Binary Gender Language in Steven Universe

Because of the decreasing number of people identifying with cis-gender identity and the need for multiple gender inclusion within children's television shows, I will analyze the linguistic phenomena of non-binary gender representation within the context of Cartoon Network's production Steven Universe. Through a textual analysis of this production, I will examine the language used and determine if the linguistic message, gender inclusivity, is clear to the audience. This research is important because of the cultural struggle our society faces in understanding and representing non-binary gender identity. The importance of understanding non-binary gender constructs cannot be understated, and Rebecca Sugar, the first female show-runner for Cartoon Network and creator of Steven Universe, understands the significance of her work. At the 2016 San Diego Comic Con, Rebecca stated, “It really makes a difference to hear stories about how someone like you can be loved. And if you don’t hear those stories, it will change who you are."