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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate how various types of unethical clothing manufacturing impacts peoples’ shopping attitude in different ways. The study also focused on if there was an effect on how people decided what they find more important and if there was a change in their decision making after being informed. Using an online survey, Kennesaw State University college students, faculty, staff, and community members (n=78) were conducted randomly. As a result, Fair trade (p=0.032), Sweatshop or Child labor (p=0.007), and Sustainable Material (p=0.020) had statistically significant differences after being informed. However, participants did have an increase in their ranking of their ethical priorities of clothing shopping habits (p>0.05). There were also significant differences on how different people relate and put importance of different ethical clothing concerns into their lives such as: Fair trade and gender (p=0.031), Healthy Work Environment and Employment (p=0.045), Sustainable Materials and Ethnicity (p=0.021), Sustainable Materials and Employment (p=0.047), Non-Toxic Dyes and Chemicals and Ethnicity (p=0.019), Locally Sourced Materials and Age (p=0.005), Locally Sourced Materials and Being Students or not (p=0.005), Animal Products and Gender (p=0.034), Animal Testing and Gender (p=0.001), and Animal Testing and Ethnicity (p=0.034). The results show that participants’ ethical priorities of clothing shopping behaviors were relatively favorable linked with being informed. Further research with larger sample groups and more detailed training program is needed.

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