Proposal Title

Somewhere Between Rational and Irrational: Creativity in the Graduate Research Process and Its Implications for Librarians

Presenter(s) Information

Kelly HangauerFollow

Start Date

16-3-2020 11:30 AM

End Date

16-3-2020 12:00 PM

Author(s) Bio

Kelly Hangauer (MLS) is the Education & Psychology Librarian at the University of Iowa. He works with graduate students on a daily basis, and is on a mission to better understand and support the creativity involved with advanced graduate research. In his free time, he researches the history of the bibliographic instruction movement.

Presenter Status

Academic Librarian

Keywords

Doctoral education, Creativity, Research Process, Creative Process, Kuhlthau, Mentorship, Ambiguity, Emotions, Metacognition, ACRL Framework

Presentation Type

30 minutes (e.g. Individual)

Description of Proposal

Scholars analyzing the relationship between creativity and graduate research have tended to be PhD supervisors and psychologists. Using qualitative research methods and personal insights, these authors have looked closely at what creativity in the research process entails, and have called on supervisors to more effectively, and explicitly, foster creativity in graduate student research. Within this scholarly conversation, the teaching and support services of librarians have been largely overlooked.

This presentation contends that librarians are ideal collaborators for the development of creativity in graduate research. What’s more, a review of the doctoral education literature reveals ample opportunity for librarians to engage. In order to illustrate these entry points for engagement, this presentation will identify five themes from the doctoral education literature that dovetail with the work and mission of academic librarianship. These themes include: (1) Academic support groups (2) Affective dimensions of research (3) Literature reviews as integral to creativity (4) Research as nonlinear, and (5) Metacognition.

This presentation will show how these five themes intersect with the graduate librarianship literature, Kuhlthau’s affective approach to research, metaliteracy models, and the ACRL frames, and will highlight recommendations for how the literature can inform outreach services and research consultations.

What takeaways will attendees learn from your session?

  • Attendees will have a better sense of the literature concerning creativity in graduate student research.
  • Attendees will identify ways in which this literature informs and intersects with academic librarianship

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Mar 16th, 11:30 AM Mar 16th, 12:00 PM

Somewhere Between Rational and Irrational: Creativity in the Graduate Research Process and Its Implications for Librarians

Scholars analyzing the relationship between creativity and graduate research have tended to be PhD supervisors and psychologists. Using qualitative research methods and personal insights, these authors have looked closely at what creativity in the research process entails, and have called on supervisors to more effectively, and explicitly, foster creativity in graduate student research. Within this scholarly conversation, the teaching and support services of librarians have been largely overlooked.

This presentation contends that librarians are ideal collaborators for the development of creativity in graduate research. What’s more, a review of the doctoral education literature reveals ample opportunity for librarians to engage. In order to illustrate these entry points for engagement, this presentation will identify five themes from the doctoral education literature that dovetail with the work and mission of academic librarianship. These themes include: (1) Academic support groups (2) Affective dimensions of research (3) Literature reviews as integral to creativity (4) Research as nonlinear, and (5) Metacognition.

This presentation will show how these five themes intersect with the graduate librarianship literature, Kuhlthau’s affective approach to research, metaliteracy models, and the ACRL frames, and will highlight recommendations for how the literature can inform outreach services and research consultations.