Pathways to Possibilities: Graduate Liaison Partnerships

Start Date

16-3-2020 2:15 PM

End Date

16-3-2020 3:45 PM

Author(s) Bio

Mou Chakraborty is the Director of External Library Services for SU Libraries. She also oversees distance library services. Her prior positions included Special Collections/Reference Librarian at University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Distance & Technology Librarian at Nova Southeastern University, and medical librarian positions in Boston and Missouri. In all of her positions spanning more than two decades, Mou has collaborated with departmental faculty in creative and meaningful ways. An active member in multiple library associations, Mou has presented at many conferences nationally and regionally, conducted interactive workshops on customer service and has published articles and a book. Mou holds an MA in English from University of Calcutta, India, and Masters in Library and Information Science from University of Missouri-Columbia, USA. Stephen Ford is the Coordinator of the Dr. Ernie Bond Curriculum Resource Center (CRC), directing operations of one of the three Salisbury University (SU) Libraries. He is a Research/Instructional Librarian who has served as librarian liaison to departments within the SU Seidel School of Education since 2005. During his 20 years in academic libraries, Stephen has served as an Instruction Coordinator, department chair, Faculty Senate President, Student Success Coordinator, and founding member/officer of MILEX (Maryland Information Literacy Exchange). He feels fortunate to have seen and been a part of innumerable major and minor changes throughout the years, and is always happy to try new approaches to serve patron-centeredness.

Presenter Status

Academic Librarian

Keywords

faculty-librarian collaboration, liaison, partnership, information literacy

Presentation Type

50 minutes (Roundtable, Panel, Software Demo, etc.)

Description of Proposal

Many libraries have a strong librarian liaison program that serves as a communication bridge between the library and academic departments. Salisbury University (SU) Libraries not only has such a strong program, but also enjoys having reciprocal departmental faculty liaisons to the library. The presenters will share their many unusual and creative liaison efforts, e.g. Library Liaison Duties document, Information Literacy Partner of the Month program, Course Enhancement Grant program, homemade online MaRS book ordering program, formal departmental Information Literacy Agreements, etc.

This roundtable explores the idea of strengthening partnerships with graduate departments through the liaison program. The discussion is intended to stimulate ideas for both new and experienced liaison librarians. The presenters will have structured questions and handouts. Some of the structured questions may include but are not limited to:

  • Does your library have a departmental faculty liaison to the library? If so, what is the nature of the collaboration?
  • What are the strengths and/or the weaknesses of the model that you have?
  • “Some liaisons see outreach and engagement as equivalent to advocacy, library “flag-waving,” and sometimes “not my job.”” (Vine, 2018). How do your liaison librarians feel about this responsibility?
  • How are your collaborations with graduate student campus partners different than those benefitting undergraduates?
  • Do your liaison librarians feel equipped to be successful to be a liaison to a graduate program? What kind of professional development support do they receive?
  • If your campus has a central Office of Graduate Studies, how is that relationship and in what ways do you, or would you like to, collaborate?
  • If you are willing, share some collaborations for graduate students that failed and what you think happened.
  • Do you encourage graduate students to seek help directly from their liaison librarian? How do they learn this is possible?
  • What’s the most creative collaboration you have been involved with to benefit graduate students?

Source: Vine, R. (2018). Realigning liaison with university priorities. Observations from ARL Liaison Institutes 2015-18. https://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/article/view/17244/18967

What takeaways will attendees learn from your session?

Attendees will have an open conversation on issues concerning liaison librarianship with graduate departments. We will hear different perspectives, share stories, and learn from each other.

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Mar 16th, 2:15 PM Mar 16th, 3:45 PM

Pathways to Possibilities: Graduate Liaison Partnerships

Many libraries have a strong librarian liaison program that serves as a communication bridge between the library and academic departments. Salisbury University (SU) Libraries not only has such a strong program, but also enjoys having reciprocal departmental faculty liaisons to the library. The presenters will share their many unusual and creative liaison efforts, e.g. Library Liaison Duties document, Information Literacy Partner of the Month program, Course Enhancement Grant program, homemade online MaRS book ordering program, formal departmental Information Literacy Agreements, etc.

This roundtable explores the idea of strengthening partnerships with graduate departments through the liaison program. The discussion is intended to stimulate ideas for both new and experienced liaison librarians. The presenters will have structured questions and handouts. Some of the structured questions may include but are not limited to:

  • Does your library have a departmental faculty liaison to the library? If so, what is the nature of the collaboration?
  • What are the strengths and/or the weaknesses of the model that you have?
  • “Some liaisons see outreach and engagement as equivalent to advocacy, library “flag-waving,” and sometimes “not my job.”” (Vine, 2018). How do your liaison librarians feel about this responsibility?
  • How are your collaborations with graduate student campus partners different than those benefitting undergraduates?
  • Do your liaison librarians feel equipped to be successful to be a liaison to a graduate program? What kind of professional development support do they receive?
  • If your campus has a central Office of Graduate Studies, how is that relationship and in what ways do you, or would you like to, collaborate?
  • If you are willing, share some collaborations for graduate students that failed and what you think happened.
  • Do you encourage graduate students to seek help directly from their liaison librarian? How do they learn this is possible?
  • What’s the most creative collaboration you have been involved with to benefit graduate students?

Source: Vine, R. (2018). Realigning liaison with university priorities. Observations from ARL Liaison Institutes 2015-18. https://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/article/view/17244/18967