Start Date

16-3-2020 10:45 AM

End Date

16-3-2020 11:15 AM

Author(s) Bio

Susan R. Franzen is the Nursing & Health Sciences Librarian at Illinois State University. She works closely with faculty and students as an embedded librarian across various programs in the Mennonite College of Nursing. Franzen often presents library content for master’s and PhD students in addition to working with them on their theses, dissertations and capstone projects. Franzen’s research areas of interest include embedded librarianship, flipped learning, and distance education.

Presenter Status

Academic Librarian

Keywords

nursing students, PhD, online learning, library instruction

Presentation Type

30 minutes (e.g. Individual)

Description of Proposal

PhD students have unique needs and require different resources and services from the library than undergraduates, which is especially true of professionals in a nursing program. As clinicians, many do not have experience with the research and writing intensive requirements of a doctoral degree. The majority have not taken classes for years, and their master’s degrees were more hands-on, clinically-based. They often do not feel confident in their ability to search the literature, read closely, or write expansively. A unique avenue through which to meet their needs and share library resources is a PhD colloquium course.

Students take the colloquium course for one credit hour each semester throughout their time in their graduate program. Each Friday, a different expert from the nursing college or the university campus shares his or her expertise with the students. Over the last four years, the presenter has worked closely with nursing graduate-level faculty to create relevant, helpful presentations on a variety topics. She developed unique programming for students attending both face-to-face and online simultaneously. Topics have included academic reading, writing like a pro, library tips for literature reviews, journal selection for publication, and advanced searching. Typically, the librarian is given two slots per semester on the colloquium calendar during which to present different sessions.

The benefits of presenting library information at the colloquium are that 1) students get to know their nursing librarian, 2) both students and faculty become more familiar with library resources, and 3) the librarian is seen as an expert on campus. With any type of library instruction, improvements can always be made based on challenges faced. Presenting to students both face-to-face and via an online platform at the same time can be challenging, especially if the librarian wants to do active learning. Another challenge is students throughout the program attend the sessions. They are often in different stages of their classwork and dissertations, so it’s important to remain flexible and responsive to students’ questions and past experiences. Throughout eight semesters, the presenter has adapted content and presentation style based on faculty and student feedback.

During the conference session, the librarian will share information and materials developed that others can use at their institutions. Additionally, she will share successes and challenges with tips on how to make the most of feedback from faculty and students. Lastly, she will share ideas on how to adapt her instruction for various graduate student groups and different presentation formats.

What takeaways will attendees learn from your session?

Attendees will:

1) Consider different types of programming topics to meet the needs of graduate students

2) Have access to program materials that can be adapted for their library sessions

3) Understand the benefits and challenges of developing hybrid instruction

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Mar 16th, 10:45 AM Mar 16th, 11:15 AM

Librarian at the Colloquium: Delivering Unique Library Content for PhD Students

PhD students have unique needs and require different resources and services from the library than undergraduates, which is especially true of professionals in a nursing program. As clinicians, many do not have experience with the research and writing intensive requirements of a doctoral degree. The majority have not taken classes for years, and their master’s degrees were more hands-on, clinically-based. They often do not feel confident in their ability to search the literature, read closely, or write expansively. A unique avenue through which to meet their needs and share library resources is a PhD colloquium course.

Students take the colloquium course for one credit hour each semester throughout their time in their graduate program. Each Friday, a different expert from the nursing college or the university campus shares his or her expertise with the students. Over the last four years, the presenter has worked closely with nursing graduate-level faculty to create relevant, helpful presentations on a variety topics. She developed unique programming for students attending both face-to-face and online simultaneously. Topics have included academic reading, writing like a pro, library tips for literature reviews, journal selection for publication, and advanced searching. Typically, the librarian is given two slots per semester on the colloquium calendar during which to present different sessions.

The benefits of presenting library information at the colloquium are that 1) students get to know their nursing librarian, 2) both students and faculty become more familiar with library resources, and 3) the librarian is seen as an expert on campus. With any type of library instruction, improvements can always be made based on challenges faced. Presenting to students both face-to-face and via an online platform at the same time can be challenging, especially if the librarian wants to do active learning. Another challenge is students throughout the program attend the sessions. They are often in different stages of their classwork and dissertations, so it’s important to remain flexible and responsive to students’ questions and past experiences. Throughout eight semesters, the presenter has adapted content and presentation style based on faculty and student feedback.

During the conference session, the librarian will share information and materials developed that others can use at their institutions. Additionally, she will share successes and challenges with tips on how to make the most of feedback from faculty and students. Lastly, she will share ideas on how to adapt her instruction for various graduate student groups and different presentation formats.