Proposal Title

DOIs, Citation Styles, & Citation Mangers: Gateways to Graduate Students

Start Date

22-3-2018 10:15 AM

End Date

22-3-2018 10:45 AM

Location

RM 400

Author(s) Bio

Greg R. Notess is Faculty & Graduate Services Librarian and a professor at Montana State University. He has been writing, speaking, and consulting about Internet information resources and search engines since 1991. A three-time Information Authorship award winner, he is the "Search Engine Update" columnist for Online Searcher. Greg is the author of the several books including Screencasting for Libraries, Teaching Web Search Skills: Techniques and Strategies of Top Trainers, and Government Information on the Internet.

Presenter Status

Academic Librarian

Presentation Type

30 minutes (e.g. Individual)

Description

Graduate students are deeply involved in their research and scholarly topics. They often seek out any techniques to help save them time and let them focus on their scholarship. Citations can be seen as unwanted complexities that get in the way. For that reason, librarians can use presentations, workshops, tutorials, and other information literacy delivery mechanisms focused on citation styles, managers, and/or DOIs as a means to offer assistance to graduate students while also introducing information literacy concepts as well as providing information about databases and library services.

While undergraduates may not need the power and complexity of full citation managers or details about the various incarnations of DOIs and when to use them, graduate students are reading and using dozens of sources and are receptive to learning how to manage their sources, especially for writing a thesis, dissertation, a professional project, journal articles, or any item with an extensive bibliography. Citation managers, like EndNote, Mendeley, and Zotero (to name several of the dozens available), can be a huge time-saving tool, but all of them tend to have a steep learning curve.

Positioning the library as the primary source for citation management support and instruction opens the door for many other information literacy topics. Uses of citation managers include literature searching from within the manager, integration with databases and publisher web sites, citation elements (like DOI explanations), variations in citation styles, and issues with scholarly publishing. Troubleshooting issues with citation managers can lead to explanations about organizations as authors, authority lists for authors or journal titles, title variants, data management, and permanence of URLs.

A citation manager can be used at every step of the way from article searching, to reading, analyzing, note taking, organizing, citing, and publishing. Beyond just the mechanics of how to get citation managers to work, such instruction can position librarians to be guides for the whole research and writing process.

This presentation will include audience polling, invite participant input, and have time for questions and answers. (I can also easily expand this from a 30 minute presentation to a 90 minute interactive workshop.)

Comments

Managing citations, styles, and formatting is often one of graduate students’ least favorite (and time consuming) aspects of writing theses, dissertations, and other scholarly products. Librarians, in offering to help expedite graduate students’ work by teaching workshops and offering support of citation managers, styles, and DOIs. In addition to helping the graduate students become more efficient in managing their sources, librarians can also introduce other information literacy concepts as well as providing information about databases and library services.

Citation managers, like EndNote, Mendeley, and Zotero (to name several of the dozens available), can be a huge time-saving tool, but all of them tend to have a steep learning curve. Positioning the library as the primary source for citation management support and instruction opens the door for many other information literacy topics. Uses of citation managers include literature searching from within the manager, integration with databases and publisher web sites, citation elements including DOI explanations, variations in citation styles, and issues with scholarly publishing. Troubleshooting issues with citation managers can lead to explanations about organizations as authors, authority lists for authors or journal titles, title variants, data management, and permanence of URLs.

Since citation managers can be used for searching, reading, analyzing, note taking, organizing, citing, and publishing, such instruction can position librarians to be guides for the whole research and writing process. Come with your questions and stories to share as well.

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Mar 22nd, 10:15 AM Mar 22nd, 10:45 AM

DOIs, Citation Styles, & Citation Mangers: Gateways to Graduate Students

RM 400

Graduate students are deeply involved in their research and scholarly topics. They often seek out any techniques to help save them time and let them focus on their scholarship. Citations can be seen as unwanted complexities that get in the way. For that reason, librarians can use presentations, workshops, tutorials, and other information literacy delivery mechanisms focused on citation styles, managers, and/or DOIs as a means to offer assistance to graduate students while also introducing information literacy concepts as well as providing information about databases and library services.

While undergraduates may not need the power and complexity of full citation managers or details about the various incarnations of DOIs and when to use them, graduate students are reading and using dozens of sources and are receptive to learning how to manage their sources, especially for writing a thesis, dissertation, a professional project, journal articles, or any item with an extensive bibliography. Citation managers, like EndNote, Mendeley, and Zotero (to name several of the dozens available), can be a huge time-saving tool, but all of them tend to have a steep learning curve.

Positioning the library as the primary source for citation management support and instruction opens the door for many other information literacy topics. Uses of citation managers include literature searching from within the manager, integration with databases and publisher web sites, citation elements (like DOI explanations), variations in citation styles, and issues with scholarly publishing. Troubleshooting issues with citation managers can lead to explanations about organizations as authors, authority lists for authors or journal titles, title variants, data management, and permanence of URLs.

A citation manager can be used at every step of the way from article searching, to reading, analyzing, note taking, organizing, citing, and publishing. Beyond just the mechanics of how to get citation managers to work, such instruction can position librarians to be guides for the whole research and writing process.

This presentation will include audience polling, invite participant input, and have time for questions and answers. (I can also easily expand this from a 30 minute presentation to a 90 minute interactive workshop.)