Start Date

22-3-2018 3:15 PM

End Date

22-3-2018 4:15 PM

Location

RM 400

Author(s) Bio

Jeff Dowdy, an MLIS graduate of Florida State University, has worked the past four years as Graduate Librarian at Georgia College in Milledgeville. During that time, the college has mirrored national changes in libraries, shifting from face-to-face to online instruction, and from one-shots to consultations and pre-designed modules. Currently, Jeff is trying to ease the tension between assessment and dynamic/responsive instruction, and hopes to see more scaffolded instruction at Georgia College. Mandy Havert is the Digital Research and Outreach Librarian at the University of Notre Dame. She serves as the Libraries’ liaison to the Graduate School Professional Development Team. Her efforts focus on connecting graduate students to the resources they need to succeed at the highest levels in their programs. Mandy produces numerous workshops and events targeted particularly to the graduate student population, including the dissertation and thesis camps and the Hesburgh Libraries Hackathon. She holds an MLS from Indiana University and studied history in her undergraduate work. Jennifer Mayer (MLIS, University of Oklahoma) is Head of the Library Research Services department at the University of Northern Colorado Libraries, whose work focuses on upper-division students, graduate students, and faculty. Her role as a liaison to the university’s Graduate School & International Admissions involves collaborating with Graduate School administration and staff in order to identify, build, and evolve various library services for graduate students, including writing intensives, workshops, and promoting UNC subject liaison librarians to the graduate student population. Stephanie Wiegand, Health Sciences Librarian at the University of Northern Colorado Libraries, works as a liaison librarian to eight programs offering a variety of graduate degrees; while many of these programs are hybrid, several are online-only. Stephanie is currently in her second term as the University Libraries representative to the campus Graduate Council, serving to foster communication between the Libraries and graduate faculty, while working on campus-level policies and projects important to graduate faculty and students alike. Stephanie earned her MA in LIS from the University of Missouri, Columbia.

Presenter Status

Academic Librarian

Presentation Type

50 minutes (Open format, explain in Description below)

Description

Description

Graduate student time for professional development is limited, tightly controlled during coursework, and must be prioritized. It can be argued that new learning happens best in context and at the point of need. One panelist will discuss how the Framework can be used as a foundation for building a graduate student inventory of research skills designed to identify areas for growth and match those needs with planned programming that is aligned with the demands of their respective programs.

Workshops and writing intensives for graduate students are typical pillars of graduate student programming at many academic libraries. Learn how one library used select Frames to develop outcomes for graduate programming on showing research impact, preparing to publish and author rights, teaching roles, and dissertation support. This panelist will reflect on successes and challenges regarding use of the Framework to design a variety of programs.

Learn how one panelist’s library adopted the Course Assessment Matrix planning tool, that allows librarians to track forward from the Framework to develop course objectives, learning activities, and, finally, assessment. The tool also permits users to begin with course objectives and track backwards to connect course objectives to the Framework. The panelist will share the planning document for others to use, while also giving an overview of specific examples from recent online instruction for graduate students.

Liaising with graduate students is distinct, as the needs of graduate students differ from those of other academic library constituents. Liaison work is an integral part of all academic librarian public services positions, and the work is often viewed as closely tied to teaching information literacy. No national-level standards exist to guide liaisons, though some institutions have such documents at the local level. ACRL’s Framework provides national-level standards for teaching which provides guidance for portions of liaison work. A panelist examines the possibility of using the Framework to guide liaison practices with graduate students in areas beyond classroom instruction.


Comments

Abstract

Our panelists, representing three academic libraries, used a variety of approaches to apply the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education to our work with graduate student populations. One panelist addresses the process of developing an inventory of research skills for graduate students using the Framework to guide the creation of this tool. Another panelist discusses experiences using the Framework to guide planning for graduate student workshops and a writing intensive, aka boot camp. The third panelist shares observations implementing the ACRL Frames into lesson plan development for graduate student instruction. The final panelist describes an approach using the Framework to influence a variety of liaison activities with graduate students, and how the Framework does and does not map to liaison guidelines. Attendees will have the opportunity to join a guided discussion with the panelists and share how they engage with the Framework.

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Mar 22nd, 3:15 PM Mar 22nd, 4:15 PM

Using the ACRL Framework to Build Graduate Services: Librarian Experiences from Three Institutions

RM 400

Description

Graduate student time for professional development is limited, tightly controlled during coursework, and must be prioritized. It can be argued that new learning happens best in context and at the point of need. One panelist will discuss how the Framework can be used as a foundation for building a graduate student inventory of research skills designed to identify areas for growth and match those needs with planned programming that is aligned with the demands of their respective programs.

Workshops and writing intensives for graduate students are typical pillars of graduate student programming at many academic libraries. Learn how one library used select Frames to develop outcomes for graduate programming on showing research impact, preparing to publish and author rights, teaching roles, and dissertation support. This panelist will reflect on successes and challenges regarding use of the Framework to design a variety of programs.

Learn how one panelist’s library adopted the Course Assessment Matrix planning tool, that allows librarians to track forward from the Framework to develop course objectives, learning activities, and, finally, assessment. The tool also permits users to begin with course objectives and track backwards to connect course objectives to the Framework. The panelist will share the planning document for others to use, while also giving an overview of specific examples from recent online instruction for graduate students.

Liaising with graduate students is distinct, as the needs of graduate students differ from those of other academic library constituents. Liaison work is an integral part of all academic librarian public services positions, and the work is often viewed as closely tied to teaching information literacy. No national-level standards exist to guide liaisons, though some institutions have such documents at the local level. ACRL’s Framework provides national-level standards for teaching which provides guidance for portions of liaison work. A panelist examines the possibility of using the Framework to guide liaison practices with graduate students in areas beyond classroom instruction.