Department

Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

7-8-2018

Embargo Period

8-20-2018

Abstract

We investigated relationships between population dynamics and microclimate, physiology, and the degree of mycorrhizal colonization, for three species (Piscidia piscipula L.(Sarg.)) (Fabaceae), Bunchosia swartzianaGriseb. (Malpighiaceae) and Psidium sartorianum (Bergius) Nied. (Myrtaceae)) of a tropical sub deciduous forest in Yucatan, Mexico that were growing in plots of different successional ages. We hypothesized that abundance and persistence were related to increased plasticity in CO2assimilation. We found that Piscidia piscipula had greater abundance in intermediate plots (18 to 21 years), presented higher levels of plasticity in CO2 assimilation (greater variability among individuals, plots, and seasons), presented the highest CO2 assimilation rates, and presented greater drought resistance (higher water potentials and capacitance). Conversely, Psidium sartorianum had greater abundance in older plots (more than 50 years of secondary succession), lower assimilation rates, and low levels of plasticity in CO2 assimilation. Bunchosia had intermediate values. Locally, the degree of mycorrhizal colonization was consistent with abundance across plots. Regionally (but not locally), plasticity in CO2 assimilation was consistent with abundance. We found differences in microclimates among plots and within plots among species. Physiological adjustments appeared to play an important role in the capacity to regenerate and in the successional persistence of these species in this tropical dry forest.

Journal

Forests

Journal ISSN

1999-4907

Volume

9

Issue

7

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

10.3390/f9070411

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