Title

Mission and Interests: The Strategic Formation and Function of North-South NGO Campaigns

Department

Political Science and International Affairs

Additional Department

School of Conflict Management, Peacebuilding and Development

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

7-1-2013

Abstract

International advocacy campaigns allow the concerns of disadvantaged groups in developing countries to reach policymakers. However, recent research has challenged the motivations of the Northern nongovernmental organizations involved and raised concerns about the impacts of North-South NGO partnerships on Southern NGO control. This article addresses these concerns by developing a typology of NGOs based on their financial incentives and the rigidity with which they adhere to their established organizational mission. It then models interactions between NGOs of different types as a strategic game. In the game, NGOs decide whether to enter international campaigns and, if so, manage campaign function to maximize payoff. “Participation-oriented” Northern NGOs, whose supporters reward them for undertaking advocacy, were found to run lengthy but ineffective campaigns and focus on publicity. “Outcome-oriented” groups, whose supporters reward them for measurable achievement, were found to generate higher campaign intensity but exit after either early victories or costly difficulties. The model is illustrated with a comparative analysis of two different campaigns regarding the Narmada Dam project.

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations

Journal ISSN

1075-2846

Volume

19

Issue

3

First Page

401

Last Page

423

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

10.5555/1075-2846-19.3.401

Share

COinS