Presenter Status

Academic Librarian

Description

In response to changing needs of graduate students, the University of North Texas Libraries have created unique services, spaces, and instruction. The transformation began with the recent creation of the Library Research Support Services (LRSS) department, a department focused on serving graduate students. The department quickly identified needs that fell into two categories: everyday needs and academic lifecycle needs. Everyday needs of graduate students include quiet study and writing space, writing assistance, and research assistance. Academic lifecycle needs are different, as needs vary depending on where a student is in the cycle: new graduate student, graduate student completing coursework, graduate student as professional scholar, and various stages associated with the dissertation.

To meet graduate students’ everyday needs, the libraries have constructed study rooms of varying capacities, conducted research on students’ study space preferences, collaborated with the writing lab to provide writing tutors on site, and embedded librarian services in academic colleges. Services created in response to graduate academic lifecycle needs include providing customized space, technology, and subject librarian consultation for monthly Dissertation Boot Camps; developing Graduate Student Mini-Boot Camps with themes of new graduate student support and preparation for the dissertation proposal; and delivering workshops on topics ranging from professional development to literature reviews.

We will present the development, implementation, and lessons learned from these new graduate student services and spaces. In addition, we will share plans for further transforming these services and future offerings for graduate students.

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Keywords:

academic lifecycle, graduate students, library services, library spaces, library instruction, student needs, professional development, dissertation support services, research support services, graduate student workshops

Bios:

Dr. Susan Smith is the Head of the Library Research Support Services Department at the University of North Texas Libraries. Dr. Smith’s research interests include the mission of public libraries, instructional design and libraries, research methods and assessment, and innovative library services for student and faculty success. Dr. Smith has presented at local, regional, and state conferences in Florida and Texas.

Rebecca Barham is the Art, Dance & Theatre Reference Librarian, and member of the Library Research Support Services Department at the University of North Texas. Ms. Barham’s research interests include fine art valuation, art iconography, library services for students and faculty, and innovative library space design. Ms. Barham has presented at national, regional and state conferences.

Erin O’Toole is the Science Reference Librarian, and member of the Library Research Support Services Department at the University of North Texas. Her research interests are library contributions to the retention of STEM undergraduates, and the development and impact of embedded librarian services. Ms. O’Toole has presented at local, state, and national conferences.

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Apr 1st, 10:25 AM Apr 1st, 11:15 AM

Unique Library Services for Graduate Students: Support throughout the Graduate Lifecycle

Room 400

In response to changing needs of graduate students, the University of North Texas Libraries have created unique services, spaces, and instruction. The transformation began with the recent creation of the Library Research Support Services (LRSS) department, a department focused on serving graduate students. The department quickly identified needs that fell into two categories: everyday needs and academic lifecycle needs. Everyday needs of graduate students include quiet study and writing space, writing assistance, and research assistance. Academic lifecycle needs are different, as needs vary depending on where a student is in the cycle: new graduate student, graduate student completing coursework, graduate student as professional scholar, and various stages associated with the dissertation.

To meet graduate students’ everyday needs, the libraries have constructed study rooms of varying capacities, conducted research on students’ study space preferences, collaborated with the writing lab to provide writing tutors on site, and embedded librarian services in academic colleges. Services created in response to graduate academic lifecycle needs include providing customized space, technology, and subject librarian consultation for monthly Dissertation Boot Camps; developing Graduate Student Mini-Boot Camps with themes of new graduate student support and preparation for the dissertation proposal; and delivering workshops on topics ranging from professional development to literature reviews.

We will present the development, implementation, and lessons learned from these new graduate student services and spaces. In addition, we will share plans for further transforming these services and future offerings for graduate students.