Presenter(s) Information

Alan G. Pike, Emory UniversityFollow

Presenter Status

Library Administrator

Description

While graduate student employment in libraries is nothing new, not every student job in the library is created equally. What would it mean for us to structure graduate student employment with an eye toward professional goals of students while also integrating them into day to day operations? This presentation will discuss how the Digital Scholarship Internship Program, a pilot program for graduate students in the Emory Center for Digital Scholarship, part of the Libraries and Information Technology Division of the Robert W. Woodruff Library, might serve as a model for training and professional development for graduate students working with librarians and IT professionals. The program, which employs 25–30 graduate students working around 10 hours per week, trains students from multiple disciplines in the tools and methods associated with digital scholarship and gives them opportunities to work with faculty, staff, and students on digital projects. The program provides future faculty members and those pursuing alternative academic careers the skills to blend library and IT resources in support 21st century scholarship.

This presentation will detail how graduate student employment in the center is structured, with three different tiers allowing for increasing specialization and responsibility for the provision of services, development of programming, and delivery of project work. Students in the program earn digital badges as they begin their training in the program, and earn additional badges as they acquire new specialized skills and digital methods. This presentation will discuss how this model benefits students, and how student success contributes to organizational effectiveness.

 
Apr 1st, 9:25 AM Apr 1st, 10:15 AM

Aligning Graduate Student Training and Work: Emory’s Digital Scholarship Internship Program

Room 462

While graduate student employment in libraries is nothing new, not every student job in the library is created equally. What would it mean for us to structure graduate student employment with an eye toward professional goals of students while also integrating them into day to day operations? This presentation will discuss how the Digital Scholarship Internship Program, a pilot program for graduate students in the Emory Center for Digital Scholarship, part of the Libraries and Information Technology Division of the Robert W. Woodruff Library, might serve as a model for training and professional development for graduate students working with librarians and IT professionals. The program, which employs 25–30 graduate students working around 10 hours per week, trains students from multiple disciplines in the tools and methods associated with digital scholarship and gives them opportunities to work with faculty, staff, and students on digital projects. The program provides future faculty members and those pursuing alternative academic careers the skills to blend library and IT resources in support 21st century scholarship.

This presentation will detail how graduate student employment in the center is structured, with three different tiers allowing for increasing specialization and responsibility for the provision of services, development of programming, and delivery of project work. Students in the program earn digital badges as they begin their training in the program, and earn additional badges as they acquire new specialized skills and digital methods. This presentation will discuss how this model benefits students, and how student success contributes to organizational effectiveness.