Title

Coercion and Self-Determination in Court-Connected Mediation: All Mediations Are Voluntary, But Some Are More Voluntary than Others

Department

Political Science & International Affairs

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2005

Abstract

Mediation proponents often point to self-determination as the key to the broad applicability and acceptance of mediation in courts. While early mediation programs relied on voluntary participation, many courts now require litigants to try mediation before proceeding to court. Even in mandatory mediation, self-determination is essential: disputants are free to leave the process at any point, with or without settlement, and without coercion. While voluntary mediation may be highlighted in policy and theory, it is not always realized in practice. Research and appellate court filings demonstrate that many disputants experience substantial pressure: judges may pressure parties to enter mediation, mediators may pressure them to continue with mediation, and any number of actors and factors may pressure them to settle. Questions remain about the appropriate level of pressure, however: when does encouragement become coercion? Courts must ensure that court-connected mediation is delivered as promised-that self-determination is maintained throughout. This article reviews the philosophical and practical dimensions of this difficult goal, concluding with four recommendations to minimize coercion in mediation.

Journal

The Justice System Journal

Journal ISSN

0098-261X

Volume

26

Issue

3

First Page

273

Last Page

291