Keywords

Van Gogh, Rembrandt, Art Valuation, Artist Brand, Intermediary Factors, Artist Factors, External Market Demand, Buyer Receptivity Factors, Product Factors

Document Type

Proceedings Paper

Description

Few marketing scholars have explored the field of fine arts marketing despite its significance as an area of economic activity and human creativity. Billions of dollars change hands annually in the worldwide visual fine arts industry (Velthuis, 2007; Clark and Flaherty, 2002), defined here to include various paintings, sculptures, and ceramics. This lack of academic attention might be because marketing scholars perceive that issues related to fine arts have little to do with marketing. It could also be that the unique characteristics of fine arts marketing are thought not to lend themselves to a traditional analytical approach to explain a particular artist’s success or lack of success. The inherently subjective nature of art products makes it challenging to identify the factors that determine or influence the “pricing” of a work of art.

 

Rembrandt Versus Van Gogh: A Qualitative Contrast Study Applying a Visual Arts Valutation Model

Few marketing scholars have explored the field of fine arts marketing despite its significance as an area of economic activity and human creativity. Billions of dollars change hands annually in the worldwide visual fine arts industry (Velthuis, 2007; Clark and Flaherty, 2002), defined here to include various paintings, sculptures, and ceramics. This lack of academic attention might be because marketing scholars perceive that issues related to fine arts have little to do with marketing. It could also be that the unique characteristics of fine arts marketing are thought not to lend themselves to a traditional analytical approach to explain a particular artist’s success or lack of success. The inherently subjective nature of art products makes it challenging to identify the factors that determine or influence the “pricing” of a work of art.